Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Macromolecular Rapid Communications

June 1, 2011

Volume 32, Issue 11

Pages 775–848

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 11/2011

      Christoph H. Braun, Benjamin Schöpf, Chheng Ngov, Cyril Brochon, Georges Hadziioannou, Edward J. W. Crossland and Sabine Ludwigs

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190024

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      Front Cover: The front cover shows an optical micrograph of ≈14 nm high terraces observed in a thin film of poly(para-phenylenevinylene)-block-poly(lactic acid) block copolymers. The sketches highlight a possible arrangement of these rod-coil block copolymers within the terraces together with the hole-conducting properties within the rod-like phases. Further details can be found in the Communication by C. H. Braun, B. Schöpf, C. Ngov, C. Brochon, G. Hadziioannou, E. J. W. Crossland, and S. Ludwigs* on page 813.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 11/2011

      Cunjiang Yu, Yuping Pan, Huan Ma, Teng Ma, Jiaping Zhang, Yanmei Song, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Lenore Dai and Hanqing Jiang

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190025

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      Back Cover: This cover picture shows schematic layered structures of thin silicon film bonded with PNIPAAm hydrogels through PDMS and hydrolyzed TMOS. Ultra-thin silicon films become adaptive (mechanically deformed to be periodic wrinkled forms) and can be reversibly driven to be flat as the temperature of the hydrogels changes where dramatic volume changes accordingly. Further details can be found in the article by C. Yu, Y. Pan, H. Ma, T. Ma, J. Zhang, Y. Song, M. Yashar S. Kalani, L. Dai, and H. Jiang* on page 820.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 11/2011 (pages 775–778)

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190023

  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Combining RAFT Radical Polymerization and Click/Highly Efficient Coupling Chemistries: A Powerful Strategy for the Preparation of Novel Materials (pages 779–800)

      M. Alyse Harvison and Andrew B. Lowe

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100156

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      Recent developments in combining reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) radical polymerization with a range of click reactions and other highly efficient coupling chemistries is highlighted demonstrating the powerful partnership these synthetic strategies offer.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Precision Synthesis of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) from Catalyst-Transfer Suzuki−Miyaura Coupling Polymerization (pages 801–806)

      Tsutomu Yokozawa, Ryosuke Suzuki, Masataka Nojima, Yoshihiro Ohta and Akihiro Yokoyama

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100037

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      Suzuki-Miyaura coupling polymerization of 2-(4-hexyl-5-iodo-2-thienyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolane (2) withtBu3PPd(Ph)Br (1) proceeds at 0°C in the presence of CsF and 18-crown-6 to yield P3HT with controlled molecular weight up to 11400 g·mol−1 and almost perfect head-to-tail regioregularity. Successive 1 -catalyzed polymerization of fluorene monomer 3 and then 2 yielded well-defined block copolymer of polyfluorene and P3HT.

    2. Rapid UV Light-Triggered Macromolecular Click Conjugations via the Use of o-Quinodimethanes (pages 807–812)

      Till Gruendling, Kim K. Oehlenschlaeger, Elena Frick, Mathias Glassner, Christina Schmid and Christopher Barner-Kowollik

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100159

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      Shining a light on click chemistry: In the current contribution, UV-radiation was employed to induce a highly efficient Diels–Alder conjugation of polymeric building blocks via the photo-induced in situ formation of highly reactive cis-dienes from a 2-methylbenzophenone precursor.

    3. Synthesis and Thin Film Phase Behaviour of Functional Rod-Coil Block Copolymers Based on Poly(para-phenylenevinylene) and Poly(lactic acid) (pages 813–819)

      Christoph H. Braun, Benjamin Schöpf, Chheng Ngov, Cyril Brochon, Georges Hadziioannou, Edward J. W. Crossland and Sabine Ludwigs

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100012

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      New functional DEH-PPV- b-PLA rod-coil block copolymers have been synthesized and investigated in bulk and thin film. Spontaneous lamellar microphase separation on the 10nm scale was observed.

    4. Thermoresponsiveness of Integrated Ultra-Thin Silicon with Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Hydrogels (pages 820–824)

      Cunjiang Yu, Yuping Pan, Huan Ma, Teng Ma, Jiaping Zhang, Yanmei Song, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Lenore Dai and Hanqing Jiang

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100083

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      Environmentally sensitive hydrogels have been successfully integrated with silicon nanoribbons, which enable the stiff silicon ribbons to become adaptive and drivable by the soft polymer substrate, such as being mechanically stretched and compressed upon a temperature change. The swelling or shrinking of the hydrogels drives the deformation of the Si ribbons by means of generating buckling patterns.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Conjugated Microporous Networks on the Basis of 2,3,5,6-Tetraarylated Diketopyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (pages 825–830)

      Kai Zhang, Bernd Tieke, Filipe Vilela and Peter J. Skabara

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100045

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      π-Conjugated microporous networks have been prepared from tetraarylated diketopyrrolo[3,4- c ]pyrrole using microwave-assisted Yamamoto or Sonogashira cross-coupling. Red insoluble powders with intense fluorescence and a high gas storage capability (BET surface areas up to 500m2·g−1) are obtained.

    6. Origin of Piezoelectricity in an Electrospun Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) Nanofiber Web-Based Nanogenerator and Nano-Pressure Sensor (pages 831–837)

      Dipankar Mandal, Sun Yoon and Kap Jin Kim

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100040

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      The piezoelectricity in an electrospun P(VDF-TrFE) nanofiber originates from the preferentially induced dipolar orientation, which does not need a further poling process after electrospinning. This is a promising indication of the ability to fabricate electrospun piezoelectric polymer-based energy harvesting devices for realistic applications.

    7. Decatungstate (W10Omath image)/Silane: A New and Promising Radical Source Under Soft Light Irradiation (pages 838–843)

      Jacques Lalevée, Nicolas Blanchard, Mohamad-Ali Tehfe and Jean Pierre Fouassier

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100099

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      In the present approach, the interaction of W10Omath imagewith silanes or ligated boranes (L[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]BH3) is investigated. The high potential of this reaction is evidenced here when using a decatungstate/silane/diphenyl iodonium salt combination as an initiating system for the ring opening photopolymerization of epoxides.

    8. Is the Reduction in Tracer Diffusivity under Nanoscopic Confinement Related to a Frustrated Segmental Mobility? (pages 844–848)

      Simone Napolitano, Cinzia Rotella and Michael Wübbenhorst

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100029

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      We developed an experimental method to determine the tracer diffusivity of probe molecules in ultrathin polymer films, able to capture the changes in the segmental mobility of probes while they diffuse through matrices of different thickness and get adsorbed onto a target substrate. The results highlight a breakdown of the Stokes–Einstein relation between orientational and translational degrees of freedom.

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