Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 18

September 15, 2011

Volume 32, Issue 18

Pages 1399–1494

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2011

      Matthew Mears, Drew S. Tarmey and Mark Geoghegan

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190048

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      Front Cover: Single polymer motion on surfaces and in confined environments is not well understood. For example, polymers can be made to move on gradients, but this motion is a complex equilibrium with the surrounding solution. Further information can be found in the article by M. Mears, D. S. Tarmey, M. Geoghegan*on page 1411.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2011

      Meta M. Bloksma, Ulrich S. Schubert and Richard Hoogenboom

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: The back cover image shows the cationic polymerization of cyclic imino ethers together with representative examples of cyclic imino ethers other than the most commonly used 2-substituted-2-oxazolines, which are covered in this review article. Various block copoly(2-oxazine)s have been featured as non-ionic surfactants while chiral 4- or 5-substituted poly(2-oxazoline)s form secondary structures like helices. Further details can be found in the article by M. M. Bloksma, U. S. Schubert,* and R. Hoogenboom*on page 1419.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
  4. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2011

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  5. Special Article Series - Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Three-dimensional Arrangement of Short DNA Oligonucleotides at Surfaces via the Synthesis of DNA-branched Polyacrylamide Brushes by SI-ATRP (pages 1405–1410)

      Olivier Y. F. Henry, Ahmed D. Mehdi, Sinead Kirwan, Josep Luis Acero Sanchez and Ciara K. O'Sullivan

      Version of Record online: 28 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100317

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      Short DNA oligonucleotide are incorporated into acrylamide brushes via surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization in an attempt to increase DNA surface density by building three-dimensional molecular architectures. The morphology and the performance of the resulting polymer are characterized by surface plasmon resonance and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, as well as MALDI-TOF analysis, and compared to monolayers of thiolated DNA strands.

  6. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Single Macromolecule Diffusion in Confined Environments (pages 1411–1418)

      Matthew Mears, Drew S. Tarmey and Mark Geoghegan

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100076

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      Single macromolecular diffusion on surfaces and, more generally, in confined geometries reveals new physical insights into molecular behaviour. Biomacromolecules have been well studied, but experimental improvements mean that the study of synthetic analogues is now feasible. Recent experimental developments are reviewed, with a view to highlighting areas in which future progress is likely.

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. Poly(cyclic imino ether)s Beyond 2-Substituted-2-oxazolines (pages 1419–1441)

      Meta M. Bloksma, Ulrich S. Schubert and Richard Hoogenboom

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The living cationic ring-opening polymerization of the less common 6- and 7-membered cyclic imino ethers as well as the 4- and 5-substituted 2-oxazolines is discussed in this review. These monomers further extend the scope of the class of poly(cyclic imino ether)s towards, e.g., new copolymer structures as well as main-chain chiral polymers.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Communication
    7. Feature Article
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    1. In vitro Evaluation of Hexagonal Polymeric Micelles in Macrophage Phagocytosis (pages 1442–1446)

      Hsieh-Chih Tsai, Che-Hau Chang, Yie-Chan Chiu, Shuian-Yin Lin, Che-Ping Lin and Ging-Ho Hsiue

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100157

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      A hexagonal lattice in nanoscale was constructed by an amphiphilic block copolymer and a porphyrin crystalline structure developed in this study. The shape shows selective uptake efficacy for the HeLa and macrophage cells after 24h incubation. We expect that targeting efficiency of drug could be improved by modified the shaped with hexagonal lattice.

    2. Synthesis of Cyclopentadienyl Capped Polyethylene and Subsequent Block Copolymer Formation Via Hetero Diels-Alder (HDA) Chemistry (pages 1447–1453)

      Edgar Espinosa, Mathias Glassner, Christophe Boisson, Christopher Barner-Kowollik and Franck D'Agosto

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100310

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      Hetero Diels-Alder (HDA) chemistry was employed for the modular synthesis of block copolymers utilizing polyethylene end capped with a cyclopentadienyl moiety. Poly(isobornyl acrylate) and polystyrene obtained by RAFT polymerization with BPDF as chain transfer agent were used as dienophiles. The success of block copolymer formation was shown by high-temperature SEC and NMR spectroscopy.

    3. Effects of Thermal Annealing Upon the Nanomorphology of Poly(3-hexylselenophene)-PCBM Blends (pages 1454–1460)

      Samuele Lilliu, Tiziano Agostinelli, Eric Verploegen, Ellis Pires, Mark Hampton, Mohammed Al-Hashimi, Martin J. Heeney, Michael F. Toney, Jenny Nelson and J. Emyr Macdonald

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100330

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      The crystallographic dynamics of low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) poly(3-hexylselenophene) (P3HS) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) film bulk heterojunction (BHJ) has been characterized by GI-XRD, during in situ ‘step-by-step’ thermal annealing from room temperature to 250°C.

    4. One-Pot Synthesis of Microcapsules with Nanoscale Inclusions (pages 1461–1466)

      Xiaobo Hu, Zhen Tong and L. Andrew Lyon

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100338

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      Temperature responsive microgel capsules containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) inclusions were prepared by one-pot synthesis. By preventing self-cross-linking during pNIPAm synthesis via low temperature, redox initiated synthesis, the majority of the encapsulated “core” polymer chains escape from the shell after decreasing the temperature. Remnant grafted/entrapped segments within the hollow particle then form thermoreversible, nanoscale inclusions within the hollow particle, providing a platform for a hierarchical nanocarrier design.

    5. Peripheral Cyanohexyl Substituent in Wide Bandgap Polymer: Increase the Electron Injection Property for Blue Phosphorescence Light Emitting Device (pages 1467–1471)

      Dehua Hu, Gang Cheng, Ping Lu, He Liu, Fangzhong Shen, Fenghong Li, Ying Lv, Wenyue Dong and Yuguang Ma

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100179

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      Cyano group, which possesses strong electron-withdrawing property, was attached on the hexyl side chain to obtain wide band gap polymer, PCNCzSi. Highly efficient spin-coated phosphorescent polymer light-emitting device, using PCNCzSi as the host for blue iridium complex FIrpic was prepared, and the maximum luminous efficiency and maximum external quantum efficiency of the devices were reached to 15 cd/A and 6.7%, respectively.

    6. Tuning the Donor–Acceptor Strength of Low-Bandgap Platinum-Acetylide Polymers for Near-Infrared Photovoltaic Applications (pages 1472–1477)

      Chuanjiang Qin, Yingying Fu, Chung-Hin Chui, Chi-Wai Kan, Zhiyuan Xie, Lixiang Wang and Wai-Yeung Wong

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100247

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      Two low-bandgap polyplatinynes (P1 and P2) consisting of weakly electron-donating fluorene and strongly electron-withdrawing heteroquinoids are reported, which induce a significant charge-transfer in the polymer main chain. They have respective optical bandgaps of 1.54 and 1.65eV, with more favorable HOMO levels for near-infrared photo-to-electrical energy generation. Bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices showing power conversion efficiency of up to 1% have been demonstrated.

    7. Synthesis and Characterizations of Regioregular Poly(3-alkylthiophene) with Alter1483ting Dodecyl/1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorooctyl Side Chains (pages 1478–1483)

      Yanfang Geng, Keisuke Tajima and Kazuhito Hashimoto

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100275

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      A regioregular P3DDFT with alternating alkyl and semifluoroalkyl side chains is synthesized. Short ethylene spacer between perfluorohexyl part and thiophene does not largely affect the absorption and emission properties of the polythiophene backbone but the charge transport properties suggest that P3DDFT could have a less ordered packing structure both in the bulk and at the dielectric interface.

    8. A Green Approach for the Synthesis and Thiol-ene Modification of Alkene Functio1489lized Poly(2-oxazoline)s (pages 1484–1489)

      Kristian Kempe, Richard Hoogenboom and Ulrich S. Schubert

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bulk (co)polymerizations of fatty acid-based 2-(dec-9-enyl)-2-oxazoline via cationic ring-opening polymerization are reported. Furthermore, the functionalization of the resulting homopolymers via thiol-ene reactions in “green” solvents is demonstrated.

    9. Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study (pages 1490–1494)

      Wibke Meiser and Michael Buback

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100228

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      In order to compare RAFT equilibrium constants from experiment and from quantum-chemical calculation, the model system CPDB – cyano-iso-propyl radical has been investigated via EPR spectroscopy. In contrast to the results from quantum-chemical calculations, the experimental data indicate fast fragmentation of the RAFT intermediate radical.

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