Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 23

December 1, 2011

Volume 32, Issue 23

Pages 1858–1934

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2011 (page 1858)

      Jianxiong Xu, Da Wang, Na Li, Yaoyao Zhang, Wangqing Zhang and Pingchuan Sun

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190064

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      Front Cover: The coupling reaction between polymeric nanoparticles and microparticles via the nucleophilic substitution of the appending β-diketone groups with benzyl chloride is studied. This coupling reaction results in the formation of hierarchical particles, through the nanoparticles being covalently linked onto the microparticles. Further details can be found in the article by J. Xu, D. Wang, N. Li, Y. Zhang, W. Zhang,* P. Sun on page 1916

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2011 (page 1935)

      Zhaoling Yao and Kam Chiu Tam

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190065

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      Back Cover: Stimuli-responsive fullerene containing polymers with attractive properties have been developed via various synthetic pathways. In aqueous solutions, they self-assemble into nanostructures comprised of spherical micelles, vesicles, and complex aggregates. Amphiphilic compounds, such as surfactants and drug molecules, have a dominant impact on their morphologies. Potential appli-cations in personal care and controlled drug delivery are being explored. Further details can be found in the article by Z. L. Yao and K. C. Tam* on page 1863

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2011 (pages 1859–1862)

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190062

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Stimuli-Responsive Water-Soluble Fullerene (C60) Polymeric Systems (pages 1863–1885)

      Zhaoling Yao and Kam Chiu Tam

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100426

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      This review discusses different approaches to synthesize hydrophobic and hydrophilic fullerene-containing polymers. The self-assembly behavior of stimuli-responsive fullerene-containing polymers and the impact of solvent environment on nanostructures are presented.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Concentric Ring Pattern Formation in a Competing Crystallization and Phase Separation Process (pages 1886–1890)

      Weichao Shi, He Cheng, Fenghua Chen, Yongri Liang, Xuming Xie and Charles C. Han

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100490

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      Concentric ring pattern formation, under the dynamic interplay between crystallization and phase separation, is first revealed in this study. Concentration deviation at the growth interface of crystals initiates convective concentration waves and leads to alternating amorphous-/crystalline-rich layers. Within crystalline-rich regions, lateral lamellae orientation tends to invert from radial to tangential direction.

    2. Revealing Model Dependencies in “Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study” (pages 1891–1898)

      Thomas Junkers, Christopher Barner-Kowollik and Michelle L. Coote

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100494

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      In a recent article, a method for the determination of RAFT equilibrium constants was proposed, which yielded kinetic data in mismatch with previous quantum mechanical calculations. Closer inspection of the data reveals that when model dependencies are accounted for, a good agreement between experiment and theoretical values can be achieved, especially when considering solvation effects in the calculations.

    3. Ionic Liquids as Internal Phase for Non-Aqueous PolyHIPEs (pages 1899–1904)

      Natasha Shirshova, Alexander Bismarck and Joachim H.G. Steinke

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100472

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      Stable high internal phase emulsions containing an ionic liquid doped with a lithium salt as dispersed phase are prepared and polymerised in high polymer yield. Through the identification of an appropriate surfactant and after optimization of its concentration, polyHIPE monoliths with an ionic liquid as internal phase are obtained exhibiting a typical polyHIPE morphology with high porosity.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2011 (page 1905)

      Gorkem Yilmaz, Muhammet U. Kahveci and Yusuf Yagci

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190063

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      Frontispiece: A simple and rapid synthetic tool to prepare hydrogels with reactive sites to incorporate any molecules is described. The strategy is based on the preparation of gels with clickable acetylene moieties in one pot, one step manner. Any molecule with azide groups can be conjugated onto the gel using “click chemistry”. Further details can be found in the article by G. Yilmaz, M. U. Kahveci, and Y. Yagci* on page 1906.

  7. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. A One Pot, One Step Method for the Preparation of Clickable Hydrogels by Photoinitiated Polymerization (pages 1906–1909)

      Gorkem Yilmaz, Muhammet U. Kahveci and Yusuf Yagci

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100470

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, a simple and rapid synthetic approach to prepare hydrogels possessing reactive sites to incorporate any molecules of interest by “Click Chemistry.” The strategy is based on the preparation of hydrogels with clickable acetylene groups in one pot, one step manner. Any molecule possessing azide groups can be conjugated onto the hydrogel by “Click Chemistry”.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communication
    9. Communications
    1. Oligo(glycerol) Methacrylate Macromonomers (pages 1910–1915)

      Anja Thomas, Florian K. Wolf and Holger Frey

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100432

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      Macromonomers based on oligo(glycerol) provide polyhydroxy-functional graft polymers. A facile route toward polyhydroxy-functional graft polymers via the macromonomer technique is described. Macromonomers are obtained by a straightforward AROP of protected glycidol followed by end-capping with a methacrylate moiety. In a second approach, the macromonomers are used for copolymerization with HEMA, also yielding multifunctional structures.

    2. Covalent Assembly of Hierarchical Particles by Efficient Coupling of β-Diketones and Benzyl Chloride (pages 1916–1920)

      Jianxiong Xu, Da Wang, Na Li, Yaoyao Zhang, Wangqing Zhang and Pingchuan Sun

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100448

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The coupling reaction between polymeric nanoparticles and microparticles via the nucleophilic substitution of the appending β-diketone groups with benzyl chloride is studied. This coupling reaction results in the formation of hierarchical particles, through the nanoparticles being covalently linked onto the microparticles.

    3. Shifting From Ziegler–Natta to Philips-Type Catalyst? A Simple and Safe Access to Reduced Titanium Systems for Ethylene Polymerization (pages 1921–1924)

      Nicolas Popoff, Jeff Espinas, Eric Gouré, Olivier Boyron, Erwan Le Roux, Jean-Marie Basset, Régis M. Gauvin, Aimery De Mallmann and Mostafa Taoufik

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100477

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      The reduction of silica-supported titanium(IV) chloride provides an ethylene polymerization catalyst. Generation of active species from [(≡SiO)TiCl3] is accomplished without use of hazardous aluminum alkyl derivative as cocatalyst. The obtained catalytic material produces high molecular weight polyethylene.

    4. “Schizomorphic” Emulsion Copolymerization Particles (pages 1925–1929)

      Nancy Weber, Brigitte Tiersch, Miriam M. Unterlass, Anneliese Heilig and Klaus Tauer

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100491

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      The morphology of amphiphilic block-like copolymer particles must not be fixed but can undergo reversible changes in dependence on the copolymer concentration. The cryo-scanning electron microscopy images of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)-b-polystyrene particles (the bars indicate 200 nm) illustrate the reversible transition from sphere- to ring-like structures and vice versa upon dilution and upgrading, respectively.

    5. From an Epoxide Monomer Toolkit to Functional PEG Copolymers With Adjustable LCST Behavior (pages 1930–1934)

      Christine Mangold, Boris Obermeier, Frederik Wurm and Holger Frey

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100489

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      Novel random copolymers based on ethylene oxide and a functional comonomer exhibit stimuli-responsive behavior. The solubility in water can be altered by variation of comonomer hydrophobicity as well as the comonomer content. It was possible to adjust the lower critical solution temperature in the range of 9 to 82 °C. The materials investigated in this study are promising for a variety of biomedical applications.

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