Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 24

December 15, 2011

Volume 32, Issue 24

Pages 1937–2002

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 24/2011 (page 1937)

      Carlos J. Camargo, Humberto Campanella, Jean E. Marshall, Núria Torras, Kirill Zinoviev, Eugene M. Terentjev and Jaume Esteve

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190067

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      Front Cover: A light-responsive six-dot array made of liquid crystalline elastomer–carbon nanotube composite (LCE-CNT) is displayed. Since the material contracts locally only in these regions, the dots catching light flatten. Components of composite are shown schematically (LCE and dispersant) and graphically (CNT). Further details can be found in the article by Carlos J. Camargo and co-workers on page 1953.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 24/2011 (page 1938)

      Cong Cheng, Xiao-Juan Han, Zhen-Qiang Dong, Yan Liu, Bang-Jing Li and Sheng Zhang

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190068

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: α-CDs exclusively thread on the PEG block in PEI–PEG copolymers and the resulting complexes have both rigid block (PEG-α-CD) and coil block (protonated PEI). By varying the rigid block fraction, aggregates with hollow spheres or rod-like particles can be formed simply by self-assembly in aqueous solution. Further details can be found in the article by Bang-Jing Li, Sheng Zhang, and co-workers on page 1965.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 24/2011 (pages 1939–1942)

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190066

  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Self-Rolled Polymer Tubes: Novel Tools for Microfluidics, Microbiology, and Drug-Delivery Systems (pages 1943–1952)

      Valeriy Luchnikov, Leonid lonov and Manfred Stamm

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100482

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      Thin, bilayer polymer films roll-up spontaneously in selective solvents that cause preferential swelling of one of the components of the films. The phenomenon results in microtubes with diameters varying from several hundreds of nanometers to dozens of micrometers. It can be used for the design of microcapillaries with an engineered inner surface and for encapsulation and controlled release of microparticles.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Localised Actuation in Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes and Liquid Crystalline Elastomers (pages 1953–1959)

      Carlos J. Camargo, Humberto Campanella, Jean E. Marshall, Núria Torras, Kirill Zinoviev, Eugene M. Terentjev and Jaume Esteve

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100578

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A method for creating sufficiently well-aligned liquid crystal (LC) units to produce localised actuation on the millimetre-scale is presented. The method demonstrates that it is feasible to stretch and optically drive a LC elastomer–carbon nanotube composite film within a localised area, since only the walls of the stretched part of the film contain aligned LC domains.

    2. Synthesis of Clicked Imidazolium-Containing Biosourced Copolymers and Application in Carbon Nanotube Dispersion (pages 1960–1964)

      Rosica Mincheva, Franck Meyer, Pierre Verge, Jean-Marie Raquez, Leen Billiet, Filip Du Prez and Philippe Dubois

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100566

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      Alkyne-functionalized aliphatic polyester backbones are functionalized by various amounts of an imidazolium-based ionic liquid through “click” reaction. In solution, these polymers exhibit high binding ability toward carbon nanotubes with fine tuning of quantity of dispersed CNTs as a function of the imidazolium content.

    3. Self-Assembly of Rod–Coil Polyethylenimine–Poly(ethylene glycol)–α-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes into Hollow Spheres and Rod-Like Particles (pages 1965–1971)

      Cong Cheng, Xiao-Juan Han, Zhen-Qiang Dong, Yan Liu, Bang-Jing Li and Sheng Zhang

      Article first published online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100514

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      This paper describes the self-assembly of rod–coil inclusion complexes, polyethylenimine–poly(ethyle glycol)–α-cyclodextrin (PEI–PEG–α-CD). α-CDs should exclusively thread on the PEG block in PEI–PEG copolymers and the resulting complexes have both rigid block (PEG–α-CD) and coil block (protonated PEI). By varying the rigid block fraction, aggregates with hollow spheres or rod-like particles could be formed by self-assembly in aqueous solution.

    4. Water Content of Hydrated Polymer Brushes Measured by an In Situ Combination of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (pages 1972–1978)

      Jagoba J. Iturri Ramos and Sergio E. Moya

      Article first published online: 25 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100455

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      The combination of QCM-D and ellipsometry in a single device is used to determine the absolute water content of hydrated brushes composed of ionic strength-responsive PSPM and PMETAC and of thermosensitive PNIPAM polymers, and the percentage of water lost during brush collapse either with high ionic strengths or temperatures above the LCST.

    5. Polymeric Photoresist Nanoparticles: Light-Induced Degradation of Hydrophobic Polymers in Aqueous Dispersion (pages 1979–1985)

      Daniel Klinger and Katharina Landfester

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100493

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      Light-sensitive hydrophobic nanoparticles consisting of a photoresist polymer are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization of a labile protected methacrylic acid monomer. Irradiation of the nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion leads to particle dissolution by converting the initial hydrophobic polymer into hydrophilic poly(methacrylic acid). Incorporation of the fluorescence-sensitive Nile red serves as a solvatochromic probe to study the particle degradation.

    6. Microspheres Consisting of Optically Active Helical Substituted Polyacetylenes: Preparation via Suspension Polymerization and Their Chiral Recognition/Release Properties (pages 1986–1992)

      Bo Chen, Ci Song, Xiaofeng Luo, Jianping Deng and Wantai Yang

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100557

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      Cross-linked microspherescontaining optically active helical substituted polyacetylene are prepared via suspension polymerization. Such microspheres exhibit optical activity due to the helical conformation of polyacetylenes, which endow the microspheres with chiral recognition/release ability.

    7. Sensitivity of Carbon Nanotubes to the Storage of Stress in Polymers (pages 1993–1997)

      Célia Mercader, Christèle Jaillet, Noa Lachman, Cécile Zakri, Maryse Maugey, Hanoch Daniel Wagner and Philippe Poulin

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100577

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      Residual stress is ubiquitous in most polymer technologies. It can cause undesired deformations, defects, or be sought after for shape memory phenomena. It is shown that the Raman response of carbon nanotubes in polymers strongly varies as a function of the stress stored by the polymer, thus providing a new tool for sensing residual stress.

    8. Patterned Growth of Vertically Aligned Polypyrrole Nanowire Arrays (pages 1998–2002)

      Lin Xia, Baogang Quan and Zhixiang Wei

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100478

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      Vertically aligned polypyrrole (PPy) nanoarrays with a precisely controlled growth site and density are prepared by combining a top-down microfabrication technique and a bottom-up electrochemical polymerization method. The PPy nanoarrays on the patterned substrate show typical Schottky contact characteristics, which is promising for their potential sensing application.

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