Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 32 Issue 3

February 2, 2011

Volume 32, Issue 3

Pages 251–331

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2011

      Clemens Ebner, Thomas Bodner, Franz Stelzer and Frank Wiesbrock

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: The cover image highlights the continuously growing interest in microwave-assisted polymerizations. Prominent examples of current research activities, in particular from the area of microwave-assisted material fabrication, are represented in the surrounding figures. Further details can be found in the article by C. Ebner, T. Bodner, F. Stelzer, and F. Wiesbrock*on page 254.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2011 (pages 251–253)

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190004

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. One Decade of Microwave-Assisted Polymerizations: Quo vadis? (pages 254–288)

      Clemens Ebner, Thomas Bodner, Franz Stelzer and Frank Wiesbrock

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000539

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper summarizes the most recent trends in the research area of microwave-assisted polymer synthesis, which continues to be an expanding field of research as indicated by the exponentially growing number of publications. Radical as well as step-growth and ring-opening polymerizations under microwave irradiation as well as the microwave-assisted material fabrication and scale-up in microwave reactors are addressed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Electrically Conductive Polymeric Materials with High Stretchability and Excellent Elasticity by a Surface Coating Method (pages 289–294)

      Yongjin Li, Liping Zhao and Hiroshi Shimizu

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000470

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      A conductive film with high stretchability and excellent elasticity has been fabricated through a simple surface coating technique. The surface coated SEBS film combines the high conductivity of the surface layer and the excellent mechanical properties (both the stretchability and the elasticity) of the base layer. Moreover, the surface-coated conductive films have a high conductivity retention upon the mechanical deformation.

    2. Silica-Polymethacrylate Hybrid Particles Synthesized Using High-Pressure Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (pages 295–301)

      Joanna Pietrasik, Chin Ming Hui, Wojciech Chaladaj, Hongchen Dong, Jihoon Choi, Janusz Jurczak, Michael R. Bockstaller and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000531

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hybrid nanoparticles with a silica core and grafted poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) chains were prepared via activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) at room temperature under high pressure (6 kbar). High pressure enabled relatively fast synthesis of those materials due to enhanced propagation rate constant and reduced termination rate constant for polymerizations conducted under high pressure. Molecular weights of grafted chains greater than 1 million were obtained. The molecular weights of polymers attached to particles are the highest reported to date.

    3. Synthesis and Characterization of a Block Copolymer Containing Regioregular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) and Poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (pages 302–308)

      Nadia Hundt, Quan Hoang, Hien Nguyen, Prakash Sista, Jing Hao, John Servello, Kumaranand Palaniappan, Mussie Alemseghed, Michael C. Biewer and Mihaela C. Stefan

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000502

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      Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) rod–rod diblock copolymer was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of γ-benzyl-L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride using benzylamine-terminated regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) macroinitiator. The block copolymer yielded morphological changes as a function of the casting solvent and thermal treatment.

    4. Polydomain–Monodomain Orientational Process in Smectic-C Main-Chain Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers (pages 309–315)

      Antoni Sánchez-Ferrer and Heino Finkelmann

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000590

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      The orientational process that occurs during the polydomain-to-monodomain transformation is studied in detail by means of stress–strain and X-ray experiments. The results show that a polydomain of SmC MCLCE is softer than a monodomain parallely stretched with respect to the director, but harder than a perpendicularly stretched. The applied mechanical field couples to the mesogens, and induces a rearrangement of the smectic layering as a conical layer distribution.

    5. Flow-Induced Polymer Degradation During Ink-Jet Printing (pages 316–320)

      Khalid A-Alamry, Keith Nixon, Rachel Hindley, Jeffrey A. Odel and Stephen G. Yeates

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000521

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      We report the first observation of, and conditions for, the extensional flow induced degradation of polymer molecular weight under conditions of drop on demand inkjet printing for linear atactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) in a range of good solvents.

    6. Improved Synthesis Strategy of Poly(amidoamine)s for Biomedical Applications: Catalysis by “Green” Biocompatible Earth Alkaline Metal Salts (pages 321–325)

      Arkadi Zintchenko, Leonardus J. van der Aa and Johan F. J. Engbersen

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000545

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel approach for synthesis of poly(amidoamine)s, using catalysts based on earth alkali metals was established, which led to remarkable reduction of polymerization times. Characteristics of earth alkali metals such as low toxicity and good biocompatibility make the approach especially useful in the preparation of these polymers for biomedical applications.

    7. Mono-, Di-, or Triazidated Cyclodextrin-Based Polyrotaxanes for Facile and Efficient Functionalization via Click Chemistry (pages 326–331)

      Hoon Hyun and Nobuhiko Yui

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000631

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      Mono-, di-, or triazidated cyclodextrin-based polyrotaxanes are directly utilized for the introduction of the desired ligand under precise control over the ligand density via click chemistry. The azidated polyrotaxanes, which have ready-made conjugation sites, are prepared from mono-, di-, or triazidated α-cyclodextrins for controlling the number of introduced ligands, as well as for facile and efficient functionalization.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2011

      Yongjin Li, Liping Zhao and Hiroshi Shimizu

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201190005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Electrically conductive polymer films with high stretchability and excellent elasticity were simply fabricated by coating a conductive layer on the surface of an elastomer film. The high electrical conductivity was achieved by high MWCNTs conductive network in the coated layer, while the supporting base film provided the excellent stretchability and elasticity. Further details can be found in the article by Y. Li,* L. Zhao, and H. Shimizu on page 289.

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