Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 17

Special Issue: Molecular Bioengineering Meets Polymer Science

September 14, 2012

Volume 33, Issue 17

Pages 1413–1492

Issue edited by: Carsten Werner

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2012 (page 1413)

      Jens Friedrichs, Andrea Zieris, Silvana Prokoph and Carsten Werner

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290059

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      Front Cover: Atomic-force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy is applied to quantify the effect of biofilm-degrading enzymes on the adhesion of a biofilmforming bacterial strain. Insights on the mechanism of the initial adhesion and on the nature of the adhesionmediating molecules were gained. Further details can be found in the article by J. Friedrichs, A. Zieris, S. Prokoph, and C. Werner* on page 1453.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2012 (page 1496)

      Cornelia Lee-Thedieck and Joachim P. Spatz

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290060

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      Back Cover: The cover picture shows hematopoietic TF-1 cells in contact with a biofunctionalized nanopatterned surface that was prepared by block copolymer micelle nanolithography. The nanostructure of the environment significantly influences hematopoitic stem cells. Further details can be found in the article by C. Lee-Thedieck and J. P. Spatz* on page 1432.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2012

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290061

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2012 (pages 1415–1418)

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290057

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
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  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Polymeric Biomaterials for Stem Cell Bioengineering (pages 1420–1431)

      Marina Prewitz, Friedrich Philipp Seib, Tilo Pompe and Carsten Werner

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200382

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      This review gives an overview of recent advances in the field of engineered polymeric biomaterials. Defined and bioresponsive materials are critical tools for the future control and support of stem and progenitor cells in vivo and in vitro, especially by mimicking particular cellular microenvironments.

  7. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Artificial Niches: Biomimetic Materials for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Culture (pages 1432–1438)

      Cornelia Lee-Thedieck and Joachim P. Spatz

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200219

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      Multiplication of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation remains an ongoing challenge. Biomimetic strategies aim at recreating the in vivo conditions under which hematopoietic stem cells can proliferate under maintenance of their full regenerative potential. The article sheds light on recent developments, points out future directions, and highlights possible applications of such biomimetic materials.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2012 (page 1439)

      Albena Lederer, Tobias Hartmann and Hartmut Komber

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290058

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      Frontispiece: Pseudo-dendrimers in four generations can be synthesized by a simple modification of a hyperbranched polyester. The increase of the generation number simply by repeating the synthetic procedure results in dense shell covering the hyperbranched core and strong decrease of the solution viscosity. This effect could be used for the implementation of hyperbranched polymers in high end applications like drug delivery, where well-defined, dense molecular surfaces are required. Further details can be found in the article by A. Lederer,* T. Hartmann, and H. Komber on page 1440.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Feature Article
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Sphere-Like Fourth Generation Pseudo-Dendrimers with a Hyperbranched Core (pages 1440–1444)

      Albena Lederer, Tobias Hartmann and Hartmut Komber

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200223

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      Pseudo-dendrimers in four generations are synthesized by a simple modification of hyperbranched polyester. This leads to a strongly reduced viscosity and increased apparent density despite increasing molar mass. NMR, static light scattering, and viscosity analysis give an insight into the specific solution behavior of the pseudo-dendrimers.

    2. Sequence Position and Side Chain Length Dependence of Charge Pair Interactions in Collagen Triple Helices (pages 1445–1452)

      Fang Wei, Jorge A. Fallas and Jeffrey D. Hartgerink

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200221

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      Collagen mimetic peptides with designed charged pair interaction were studied by thermal denaturation and modeling. The position of charged residues within the canonical X-Y-Gly repeat of collagen was found to alter thermal stability, control the relative compositional purity, and register of collagen triple helices.

    3. Quantifying the Effect of Covalently Immobilized Enzymes on Biofilm Formation by Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy (pages 1453–1458)

      Jens Friedrichs, Andrea Zieris, Silvana Prokoph and Carsten Werner

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200359

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      A novel AFM-based single-cell force spectroscopy assay is developed to quantify the impact of biofilm-degrading enzymes on the initial attachment of the marine bacterial strain Cobetia marina. The assay can be adapted to various substrates and different bacterial strains as well as to other fouling species.

    4. A Generic Strategy for Co-Presentation of Heparin-Binding Growth Factors Based on CVD Polymerization (pages 1459–1465)

      Xiaopei Deng and Joerg Lahann

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200343

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      A generic strategy for immobilizing heparin-binding growth factors on multifunctional chemical vapor deposition copolymer has been developed. Heparin is covalently attached to the aldehyde-functionalized surface through a carbohydrazide linker. The growth factor then binds directly to the heparin. The alkyne group can then be used to orthogonally immobilize other biomolecule, such as azido-functionalized adhesion peptides.

    5. Fabricating pH-Stable and Swellable Very Thin Hyperbranched Poly(ethylene imine)–Oligosaccharide Films Fabricated Without Precoating: First View on Protein Adsorption (pages 1466–1473)

      Monika Warenda, Anne Richter, Diana Schmidt, Andreas Janke, Martin Müller, Frank Simon, Ralf Zimmermann, Klaus-Jochen Eichhorn, Brigitte Voit and Dietmar Appelhans

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200255

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      Very thin dendritic glycopolymer films can be used as a platform to direct future efforts in sensing or in multienzymatic cascade reactions. Swellable and pH-stable films with film thickness (d) below 35 nm are ready for carrying out further chemical and biological modification and to evaluate film surface and film features for applications in thin film technology where no precoatings are needed.

    6. Multifunctional Polypeptide–PEO Nanoreactors via the Hydrophobic Switch (pages 1474–1481)

      Yuzhou Wu, Tao Wang, David Y. W. Ng and Tanja Weil

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200227

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      A protein-derived polypeptide system with switchable hydrophobicity and its potential to perform efficient click reaction inside hydrophobic pockets is presented in this article. This polypeptide system could serve as a biocompatible platform for convenient delivery of imaging molecules and anti-cancer drugs.

    7. Controlled Ring-Opening Polymerization of Substituted Episulfides for Side-Chain Functional Polysulfide-Based Amphiphiles (pages 1482–1486)

      Matthias Kuhlmann, Smriti Singh and Jürgen Groll

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200297

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      In this publication, controlled functional episulfide polymerization is described. Ethoxyethyl thio glycidyl ether (EETGE) and allyl thio glycidyl ether (ATGE) polymers are ring-opened homo- and block-copolymerized. The synthesis of EETGE-block-mPEG copolymers and final side-chain hydrolysis yields poly(thio glycidol)-block-mPEG copolymers forming particles in aqueous solutions.

    8. Surface Functionalization of Poly(ether imide) Membranes with Linear, Methylated Oligoglycerols for Reducing Thrombogenicity (pages 1487–1492)

      Maik Lange, Steffen Braune, Karola Luetzow, Klaus Richau, Nico Scharnagl, Marie Weinhart, Axel T. Neffe, Friedrich Jung, Rainer Haag and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200426

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      The surface of poly(ether imide) membranes was functionalized with linear, methylated oligoglycerols with M—n = 1120, 1800, and 2270 g· mol−1, and the protein adsorption as well as platelet adhesion were investigated. The oligoglycerols had a higher stability to oxidation than OEG and resisted protein and platelet adhesion equally well as poly(ether imide) surfaces functionalized with monomethoxy oligo(ethylene glycol) (M—n = 1320 g· mol−1).

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