Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 23

December 13, 2012

Volume 33, Issue 23

Pages 1973–2052

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2012 (page 1973)

      Daniel Crespy, Kathrin Friedemann and Ana-Maria Popa

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: Multicompartment materials with hierarchical structures can be prepared by colloid-electrospinning. The image shows a superposition of one stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy image and several colored micrographs of nanofibers with polymer and silica nanoparticles. Further details can be found in the article by D. Crespy,* K. Friedemann, and A.-M. Popa* on page 1978.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2012

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290082

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 23/2012 (pages 1975–1977)

      Article first published online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290080

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Colloid-Electrospinning: Fabrication of Multicompartment Nanofibers by the Electrospinning of Organic or/and Inorganic Dispersions and Emulsions (pages 1978–1995)

      Daniel Crespy, Kathrin Friedemann and Ana-Maria Popa

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200549

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colloid-electrospinning allows the formation of hierarchically nanostructured materials. Multicompartment nanofibers are formed by electrospinning nanoparticles, microgels, or emulsions. Such materials find applications in drug delivery, photonics, and catalysis.

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Anion Responsive Imidazolium-Based Polymers (pages 1996–2014)

      John Texter

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The anion or solvent stimuli responsiveness of imidazolium-based copolymers arises from dramatic solubility variations among particular anion–imidazolium ion pairs. These ion pairs can be tuned from solvophilic to solvophobic through anion exchange, and reversible poration, condensation, and stabilization are examples of concomitant properties.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Injectable Nanohybrid Scaffold for Biopharmaceuticals Delivery and Soft Tissue Engineering (pages 2015–2022)

      Huaping Tan, Qing Shen, Xiaojia Jia, Zipeng Yuan and Dangsheng Xiong

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200360

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanofibrous hydrogel is produced via the biological conjugation of biotin-terminated star poly(ethylene glycol) and streptavidin-functionalized hyaluronic acid. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is entrapped in low-molecular-weight heparin/N,N,N-trimethylchitosan chloride nanoparticles by affinity interactions.

    2. Side-Chain Modification and “Grafting Onto” via Olefin Cross-Metathesis (pages 2023–2028)

      Lucas Montero de Espinosa, Kristian Kempe, Ulrich S. Schubert, Richard Hoogenboom and Michael A. R. Meier

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200487

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Olefin cross-metathesis (CM) enables an efficient side-chain functionalization of polymers having terminal alkenes as pendant groups. Acrylates and cis-2-butene-1,4-diacetate are used as CM partners to introduce a variety of functional groups. The scope and limitations of this polymer functionalization technique are discussed.

    3. Arrangement of C60 via the Self-Assembly of Post-Functionalizable Polyisocyanate Block Copolymer (pages 2029–2034)

      Joonkeun Min, Priyank N. Shah, Chang-Geun Chae and Jae-Suk Lee

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200459

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A well-defined post-functionalizable block copolymer, poly(furfuryl isocyanate)-b-poly (hexyl isocyanate) (PFIC-b-PHIC), is synthesized via living anionic polymerization. In addition, a very simple approach to produce highly arranged C60 involving the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer is presented.

    4. Toward Mass Producible Ordered Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices (pages 2035–2040)

      Taeyong Kim, Hyunsik Yoon, Hyung-Jun Song, Niko Haberkorn, Younghyun Cho, Seung Hyun Sung, Chang Hee Lee, Kookheon Char and Patrick Theato

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new strategy to fabricate nanostructured P3HT films for organic solar cells by employing reusable soft replica molds is presented. With a UV-curable PFPE mold, P3HT nanopillars as well as P3HT nanocavity structures are obtained by exploiting the self-replication of replica molds. The method demonstrates the possibility to reproducibly prepare well-defined ordered bulk hetero-junction OPVs using reusable PFPE molds.

    5. An Efficient Thiol-Ene Chemistry for the Preparation of Amphiphilic PHA-Based Graft Copolymers (pages 2041–2045)

      Gaëlle Le Fer, Julien Babinot, Davy-Louis Versace, Valérie Langlois and Estelle Renard

      Article first published online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200485

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple and efficient method to prepare thermosensitive graft polyhydroxyalkaoate (PHA) is presented. Terminal amino groups of Jeffamine are turned into thiol groups by a reaction with N-acetylhomocysteine. Subsequent grafting of ω-thiol Jeffamine on unsaturated PHA is achieved via photoinduced thiol-ene addition, leading to amphiphilic copolymers.

    6. Efficient Curing of Vinyl Carbonates by Thiol-Ene Polymerization (pages 2046–2052)

      Andreas Mautner, Xiaohua Qin, Barbara Kapeller, Guenter Russmueller, Thomas Koch, Juergen Stampfl and Robert Liska

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200502

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vinyl carbonates exhibit low toxicity together with good mechanical properties, which qualifies them to be a potential alternative to state-of-the-art (meth)acrylates. A drawback of a certain class of them containing easily abstractable hydrogens is their moderate reactivity. With the help of thiol-ene polymerization, we are able to improve the reactivity enormously up to the level of acrylates.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION