Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 33 Issue 3

February 13, 2012

Volume 33, Issue 3

Pages 177–259

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2012 (page 177)

      Kai U. Claussen, Reiner Giesa, Thomas Scheibel and Hans-Werner Schmidt

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290010

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      Front Cover: Marine mussels use their threads for attachment to any substratum and these biopolymer gradient fibers show an excellent combination of stiff and soft mechanical properties. A straightforward approach is presented for the preparation of bioinspired macroscopic longitudinal polymer gradient materials on the centimeter scale based on a poly(dimethyl siloxane) system. Fur-ther details can be found in the article by K. U. Claussen, R. Giesa, T. Scheibel, and H.-W. Schmidt* on page 206. Cover image courtesy of Genevieve Anderson.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2012 (page 264)

      Joseph Adelsberger, Ezzeldin Metwalli, Alexander Diethert, Isabelle Grillo, Achille M. Bivigou-Koumba, André Laschewsky, Peter Müller-Buschbaum and Christine M. Papadakis

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Micelles from thermoresponsive P(S-b-NIPAM-b-S) triblock copolymers show a decrease of their radius and subsequent aggregation when heated above the cloud point of PNIPAM. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering during a temperature jump unravels the kinetics of these processes and allows a quantitative description of the collapse and the aggregation. Further details can be found in the article by J. Adelsberger, E. Metwalli, A. Diethert, I. Grillo, A. M. Bivigou-Koumba, A. Laschewsky, P. Müller-Buschbaum, and C. M. Papadakis* on page 254.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2012

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290012

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2012 (pages 179–182)

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201290009

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Photodegradable Polymers for Biotechnological Applications (pages 183–198)

      George Pasparakis, Theodore Manouras, Panagiotis Argitis and Maria Vamvakaki

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100637

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let there be light. Photodegradable polymers in the form of self-assembled constructs, polymer networks, and surfaces are discussed with regards to their potential uses in biotechnological applications such as controlled drug delivery, photolithography, and biopatterning.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    1. Functionalized Nanoporous Thin Films From Photocleavable Block Copolymers (pages 199–205)

      Jean-Marc Schumers, Alexandru Vlad, Isabelle Huynen, Jean-François Gohy and Charles-Andre Fustin

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100739

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      A PS-b-PEO block copolymer bearing a photocleavable junction between the blocks is used to form nanoporous thin films with carboxylic acid functions homogeneously distributed on the pore walls. The initial light-responsive thin film, acting as a photoresist, can be easily patterned to selectively generate porosity in predetermined areas.

    2. Learning From Nature: Synthesis and Characterization of Longitudinal Polymer Gradient Materials Inspired by Mussel Byssus Threads (pages 206–211)

      Kai U. Claussen, Reiner Giesa, Thomas Scheibel and Hans-Werner Schmidt

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100620

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A straightforward approach is presented for the preparation of bioinspired, macroscopic polymer gradient materials. Compositional gradients are realized using three syringe pumps feeding different prepolymers capable of cross-linking. The stiffness within the gradient sample can be varied up to a factor of four. By addition of a dye to one component, the gradient structure can be visualized.

    3. Optically Active Helical Substituted Polyacetylenes Showing Reversible Helix Inversion in Emulsion and Solution State (pages 212–217)

      Yingying Huang, Yuanyuan Zhang, Wantai Yang and Jianping Deng

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100646

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      Substituted acetylene monomers undergo catalytic emulsion polymerization in aqueous media providing stable emulsion constituted by helical substituted polyactetylenes. Such helical polymers in emulsion demonstrate the opposite helicity when compared with the corresponding polymer solution.

    4. A Facile Route to Reassemble Titania Nanoparticles Into Ordered Chain-like Networks on Substrate (pages 218–224)

      Ya-Jun Cheng, Markus Wolkenhauer, Gina-Gabriela Bumbu and Jochen S. Gutmann

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100638

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      Titania nanoaparticles within the PS-b-PEO block copolymer composite films are reassembled into chain-like networks by simple UV exposure. The titania nanoparticles are frozen in the polymer matrix composed of the PS block after film deposition. Upon UV treatment, the PS matrix is partially removed, allowing the nanoparticles to move close to each other and pack close together.

    5. Zinc Ion Uniquely Induced Triple Shape Memory Effect of Dipole–Dipole Reinforced Ultra-High Strength Hydrogels (pages 225–231)

      Yanjiao Han, Tao Bai, Yuan Liu, Xinyun Zhai and Wenguang Liu

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100683

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      Acrylonitrile is not just for fiber: A dipole–dipole reinforced (DDR) ultrahigh strength hydrogel exhibiting triple shape memory effect has been fabricated for the first time by copolymerizing acrylonitrile with hydrophilic monomer. This strategy contributes to the discovery of a new type of shape memory hydrogels driven by Zn2+-responsive dynamic change of dipole–dipole interaction.

    6. Synthesis of High Molecular Weight Polyesters via In Vacuo Dehydrogenation Polymerization of Diols (pages 232–236)

      David M. Hunsicker, Brian C. Dauphinais, Sean P. Mc Ilrath and Nicholas J. Robertson

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100653

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      α,ω-Diols with a spacer of six or more carbons are effectively converted to high molecular weight polyesters through a dehydrogenative polymerization catalyzed by the Milstein catalyst. Performing the reaction in vacuo yields higher molecular weight polymer than that produced by purging the polymerization with inert gas. Number- averaged molecular weights approaching 150 000 g mol−1 are accessible using this polycondensation.

    7. Tuning Fluorescent Response of Nanoscale Film With Polymer Grafting (pages 237–241)

      Marius Chyasnavichyus, Volodymyr Tsyalkovsky, Bogdan Zdyrko and Igor Luzinov

      Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100658

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      An effective method for tuning fluorescent response of an ultrathin (5 nm) polymer film is reported. The ultrathin fluorescent polymer film anchored to a solid surface changes its fluorescence response if a non-fluorescent polymer of another nature is attached to its surface via covalent grafting.

    8. Living Polymerization via Anionic Initiation for the Synthesis of Well-Defined PPV Materials (pages 242–247)

      Inge Cosemans, Jimmy Wouters, Thomas Cleij, Laurence Lutsen, Wouter Maes, Thomas Junkers and Dirk Vanderzande

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100758

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A synthesis route for well-defined poly(p- phenylene vinylene) (PPV) materials is presented. Anionic polymerization conditions are achieved via selection of reaction conditions and the molecular weight is efficiently controlled by introduction of dedicated anionic initiators. Soluble PPVs with comparatively narrow molecular weight distributions in the weight range of 6 to 20 kDa were obtained.

    9. Live Monitoring of Cargo Release From Peptide-Based Hybrid Nanocapsules Induced by Enzyme Cleavage (pages 248–253)

      Julien Andrieu, Niklas Kotman, Matthias Maier, Volker Mailänder, Wolfgang S. L. Strauss, Clemens K. Weiss and Katharina Landfester

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100729

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Preparation of peptide-based hybrid nanocapsules is achieved via interfacial polyaddition in miniemulsion. A fluorescent dye is encapsulated at concentrations at which self-quenching occurs and is released after enzymatic cleavage of the peptide. The degradation of the capsules and release of the dye are monitored in real time with optical means (FRET) and fluorescence recovery.

    10. Kinetics of Collapse Transition and Cluster Formation in a Thermoresponsive Micellar Solution of P(S-b-NIPAM-b-S) Induced by a Temperature Jump (pages 254–259)

      Joseph Adelsberger, Ezzeldin Metwalli, Alexander Diethert, Isabelle Grillo, Achille M. Bivigou-Koumba, André Laschewsky, Peter Müller-Buschbaum and Christine M. Papadakis

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201100631

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Micelles from thermoresponsive P(S-b -NIPAM-b-S) triblock copolymers show a decrease of their radius and subsequent aggregation when heated above the cloud point of PNIPAM. Time-resolved SANS during a temperature jump unravels the kinetics of these processes and allows a quantitative description of the collapse and the aggregation, which is found to involve several steps.

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