Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 17

September 2013

Volume 34, Issue 17

Pages 1337–1415

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
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      Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2013 (page 1337)

      Juno Lee, Sung Ho Yang, Seok-Pyo Hong, Daewha Hong, Haeshin Lee, Hee-Yoon Lee, Yang-Gyun Kim and Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201370055

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      Front Cover: The division timing of yeast cells is controlled chemically, as a step towards realization of artificial spores, by encapsulating individual yeast within polymeric multilayers of catechol-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid pairs by the layer-by-layer technique and subsequently cross-linking the layers. Further details can be found in the article by J. Lee, S.-H. Yang, S.-P. Hong, D. Hong, H. Lee, H.-Y. Lee, Y.-G. Kim, and I. S. Choi* on page 1351.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2013 (page 1420)

      Qun Niu, Mingwang Pan, Jinfeng Yuan, Xiao Liu, Xiaomei Wang and Haifeng Yu

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201370058

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      Back Cover: Anisotropic P(VC-co-AAEM)/PS nanoparticles with controllable morphologies are fabricated from noncrosslinked P(VC-co-AAEM) seeds. The phase separation and the number of nucleated bulges of the obtained composite are controlled by adjusting the content of AAEM in seeds and the reaction time of seeded emulsion polymerization. Further details can be found in the article by Q. Niu, M. Pan,* J. Yuan, X. Liu, X. Wang, and H. Yu* on page 1363.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
    1. Masthead: Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2013

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201370056

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Feature Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
    1. Polydiacetylene-Peptide 1D Nanomaterials (pages 1343–1350)

      Stephen R. Diegelmann and John D. Tovar

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300423

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      This article discusses recent developments in the preparation of 1D nanomaterials containing biomimetic peptide sequences and conjugated polydiacetylenes. This is one subset of the exciting area of polydiacetylenes that has been at the forefront of conjugated polymer materials science for over four decades.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Articles
    7. Communications
    1. Chemical Control of Yeast Cell Division by Cross-Linked Shells of Catechol-Grafted Polyelectrolyte Multilayers (pages 1351–1356)

      Juno Lee, Sung Ho Yang, Seok-Pyo Hong, Daewha Hong, Haeshin Lee, Hee-Yoon Lee, Yang-Gyun Kim and Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300444

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      Catechol-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid are coated onto individual yeast cells by layer-by-layer assembly at pH 6.5, and the formed artificial polymeric shell is cross-linked via oxidative coupling at pH 8.5 to achieve the multiple-point control of cell division. The controlled retardation of cell division is confirmed by comparing the time when ln(OD600) reaches −2.0.

    2. Luminescent Polymer Consisting of 9,12-Linked o-Carborane (pages 1357–1362)

      Masato Tominaga, Yasuhiro Morisaki and Yoshiki Chujo

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300368

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      The synthesis of luminescent polymer containing alternating p-phenylene-ethynylene and 9,12-linked o-carborane units in the main chain is reported. Synthetic details, characterizations, and optical properties of the 9,12-linked o-carborane conjugated system are discussed.

    3. Anisotropic Nanoparticles with Controllable Morphologies from Non-Cross-Linked Seeded Emulsion Polymerization (pages 1363–1367)

      Qun Niu, Mingwang Pan, Jinfeng Yuan, Xiao Liu, Xiaomei Wang and Haifeng Yu

      Version of Record online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300431

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      Anisotropic P(VC-co-AAEM)/PS NPs with tunable morphologies are successfully fabricated via emulsifier-free SEP from non-cross-linked P(VC-co-AAEM) seeds. Both the content of AAEM in the seed preparation and the reaction time of the following SEP can greatly influence the dimension and morphology of NPs. This elegant approach is simple and effective, which is easy to scale up.

    4. Noncovalent Chiral Functionalization of Graphene with Optically Active Helical Polymers (pages 1368–1374)

      Chonglei Ren, Yu Chen, Haiyang Zhang and Jianping Deng

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300342

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      Graphene is noncovalently functionalized with optically active helical substituted polyacetylenes. The resulting graphene composites demonstrate interesting optical activity and largely improved dispersibility in organic solvents. A variety of novel composite materials will be prepared following the same methodology and may find significant applications in asymmetric catalysis, chiral sensoring and chiral adsorption.

    5. Green Polymer Chemistry VIII: Synthesis of Halo-ester-Functionalized Poly(ethylene glycol)s via Enzymatic Catalysis (pages 1375–1380)

      Marcela Castano, Kwang Su Seo, Eun Hye Kim, Matthew L. Becker and Judit E. Puskas

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300430

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      This paper describes the efficient “green” synthesis of halo-ester- functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) via Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)-catalyzed transesterification of alkyl halo-esters under solventless conditions. Quantitative functionalizations are achieved in less than 2.5 h with tetraethylene glycol monobenzyl ether, and less than 4 h with PEG-monomethyl ether (inline image = 2000 g mol−1, inline image/inline image = 1.2).

    6. Acyclic Diene Metathesis Polymerization and Heck Polymer–Polymer Conjugation for the Synthesis of Star-shaped Block Copolymers (pages 1381–1386)

      Lucas Montero de Espinosa, Matthias Winkler and Michael A. R. Meier

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300472

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      Three- and four-arm star shaped (block) polymers are synthesized via acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization and subsequent efficient polymer–polymer coupling using the Heck reactions. Thus, three- and four-arm star shaped di- and triblock copolymers with molecular weights up to 31 kDa are obtained and characterized.

    7. One-Pot Synthesis of Redox-Responsive Polymers-Coated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles and Their Controlled Drug Release (pages 1387–1394)

      Jiao-Tong Sun, Ji-Gang Piao, Long-Hai Wang, Mohsin Javed, Chun-Yan Hong and Cai-Yuan Pan

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300477

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      A facile one-pot method for the preparation of cross-linked polymer-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) via surface RAFT polymerization is presented for the first time, and the release of doxorubicin (DOX) from this biocompatible drug carrier is redox-responsive. It is envisioned that this grafting strategy will be useful for fabricating different stimuli-responsive MSN-based drug delivery systems.

    8. Propargyl-Functional Aliphatic Polycarbonate Obtained from Carbon Dioxide and Glycidyl Propargyl Ether (pages 1395–1400)

      Jeannette Hilf and Holger Frey

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300425

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      Alkyne functional aliphatic polycarbonates with tailored functionality can be prepared directly from CO2 and functional glycidyl ethers. Glycidyl propargyl ether and glycidyl methyl ether (GME) are copolymerized with CO2, using a readily available Zn-pyrogallol catalyst system. The functional polycarbo­nates possess inline image between 7000 and 10 500 g mol−1 (inline image/inline image = 1.6–2.5.) The postpolymerization functionalization of the pendant alkyne groups in the polymer backbone is shown to be highly efficient and occurs without observable polymer degradation, giving access to a range of new functional aliphatic poly(carbonate)s.

    9. Supramolecular Hydrogel Capsules Based on PEG: A Step Toward Degradable Biomaterials with Rational Design (pages 1401–1407)

      Torsten Rossow, Sebastian Bayer, Ralf Albrecht, C. Christoph Tzschucke and Sebastian Seiffert

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300353

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      Supramolecular microgel capsules that contain living cells can be fabricated by droplet-based microfluidic templating. Microfluidic devices are used to form monodisperse premicrogel droplets that contain bipyridine end-capped polyethylene glycol along with living cells. Injection of an aqueous iron(II) sulfate solution into each droplet causes immediate droplet gelation by reversible bipyridine–iron complexation, thereby forming degradable cell-laden microgel capsules.

    10. Temperature and pH-Tunable Fluorescence Nanoplatform with Graphene Oxide and BODIPY-Conjugated Polymer for Cell Imaging and Therapy (pages 1408–1415)

      Tamim Mosaiab, Insik In and Sung Y. Park

      Version of Record online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201300413

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      Stimuli activatable fluorophores: A temperature and pH responsive polymeric fluorescence nanocarrier is achieved using DMA and NIPAAm copolymer, boron-dipyrromethane (BODIPY) dye, doxorubicin (DOX) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The fluorescent nanoparticles activate under physiologic temperature and a mild acidic environment and thereby instantly provide an image of the location of the cells, as well as triggered release of the drug within cancer cells.

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