Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 34 Issue 2

January 25, 2013

Volume 34, Issue 2

Pages 113–194

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
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      Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2/2013 (page 113)

      Felicitas Brömmel, Dominic Kramer, Benjamin P. Brown, Heino Finkelmann and Anke Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201370005

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      Front Cover: Conoscopy patterns of a smectic-A elastomer in a diagonal orientation in the unstretched state (left) and under an applied strain of 16% (right). The stretched elastomer appears to be a monodomain with respect to all three principal directions as a highly biaxial conoscopic interference pattern is observed. Further details can be found in the article by F. Brömmel,* D. Kramer, B. P. Brown, H. Finkelmann, and A. Hoffmann on page 135.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2/2013

      Version of Record online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201370006

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Nanoscale Inhomogeneities in Thermoresponsive Polymers (pages 119–134)

      Dennis Kurzbach, Matthias J. N. Junk and Dariush Hinderberger

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200617

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      Investigations of nanoscale inhomogeneities in thermoresponsive polymers by different experimental techniques are reviewed. Special attention is paid to studies based on electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. It is shown that the combination of macroscopic and intrinsically local methods leads to a more complete understanding of nanoscale processes during the inverse phase transition of thermoresponsive polymers.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    1. Orientability of the Minor Director of Homeotropically Aligned Smectic-A Elastomers in External Mechanical Fields (pages 135–141)

      Felicitas Brömmel, Dominic Kramer, Benjamin P. Brown, Heino Finkelmann and Anke Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200588

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      A bulk smectic-A elastomer with homeotropically oriented mesogens shows spontaneous optical biaxiality at room temperature with the minor director organized in large domains. In-plane stretching of the elastomer leads to a strong enhancement of the optical biaxiality that indicates the formation of a macroscopic 3D monodomain.

    2. Cell(MC3T3-E1)-Printed Poly(ϵ-caprolactone)/Alginate Hybrid Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration (pages 142–149)

      HyeongJin Lee, SeungHyun Ahn, Lawrence J. Bonassar and GeunHyung Kim

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200524

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      A cell-laden scaffold consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) and cell-embedded alginate struts is fabricated. The scaffold exhibits significantly high mechanical properties and outstanding biological activity. Based on these results, the applicability of the cell-laden hydrogel scaffold can be expanded from soft tissue regeneration to hard tissue regeneration.

    3. Stable, Hydroxyl Functional Polycarbonates With Glycerol Side Chains Synthesized From CO2 and Isopropylidene(glyceryl glycidyl ether) (pages 150–155)

      Jeannette Geschwind and Holger Frey

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200682

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      Hydroxyl functional aliphatic polycarbonates with tailored functionality can be prepared directly from CO2 and functional glycidyl ethers. The protected monomer isopropylidene (glyceryl glycidyl ether) (IGG) and glycidyl methyl ether (GME) are polymerized with CO2, using a readily available Zn-pyrogallol catalyst system. The functional polycarbonates possess Mn between 12 000 and 25 000 g mol−1 (Mw/Mn = 2.5–3.3) and are promising, for example, as supports for catalysts, drugs, or reagents.

    4. Combination of Episulfide Ring-Opening Polymerization With ATRP for the Preparation of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers (pages 156–162)

      Cong-Duan Vo, Christopher J. Cadman, Roberto Donno, Jeroen A. C. M. Goos and Nicola Tirelli

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200636

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      Amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide- block-glycerol monomethacrylate) (PPS-GMMA) structures are prepared via sequential ring-opening polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of protected GMMA. Their micellar assemblies can be studied on a mica surface to provide information such as the number of macromolecules per aggregate.

    5. New Design of Thiol-Responsive Degradable Polylactide-Based Block Copolymer Micelles (pages 163–168)

      Alexander Cunningham and Jung Kwon Oh

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200532

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      New thiol-responsive degradable polylactide (PLA)-based micelles are designed having disulfide linkages in the middle of triblock copolymers, and exhibiting enhanced release of encapsulated anticancer drugs upon thiol-triggered cleavage of central disulfide linkages.

    6. Pure Protein Scaffolds from Pickering High Internal Phase Emulsion Template (pages 169–174)

      Zifu Li, Manda Xiao, Jianfang Wang and To Ngai

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200553

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      Pure protein scaffolds: The fabrication of hierarchical porous protein scaffolds from oil-in-water (o/w) high internal phase emulsions stabilized by bovine serum albumin protein nanoparticles (Pickering HIPEs) at room temperature is reported. These three dimensional, bimodal meso-macroporous protein scaffolds are suitable for a wide range of bio-related applications.

    7. Synthesis and Photophysical Properties of Polyfluorene With Dipicolylamine Groups on the Side Chain: Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of Histidine (pages 175–179)

      Wenjun Zhang, Jingui Qin and Chuluo Yang

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200538

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      Two polyfluorenes with dipicolylamine (DPA) pendant, PF–TDPA and PF–HDPA, are designed and synthesized. Both the fluorescence of PF–TDPA and PF–HDPA can be efficiently quenched by Cu2+ ions in a mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran and HEPES. However, only PF–TDPA with a rigid side chain can selectively and sensitively detect histidine over other amino acids with a fluorescence recovery with a detection limit of 0.1 × 10−6 M.

    8. Stress-Induced Stabilization of Crystals in Shape Memory Natural Rubber (pages 180–184)

      Benjamin Heuwers, Dominik Quitmann, Robin Hoeher, Frauke M. Reinders, Sebastian Tiemeyer, Christian Sternemann, Metin Tolan, Frank Katzenberg and Joerg C. Tiller

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200594

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      The trigger temperature of shape memory natural rubber (SMNR) can be manipulated by the application of stress parallel to the prior programming direction. The variation of parallel stress allows increasing of the trigger temperature from 26 up to 43 °C. This effect is called stress-induced stabilization (SIS).

    9. Direct Transformation of N,N′-Methylene Bisacrylamide Self-Assembled Fibers Into Polymer Microtubes via RAFT Polymerization (pages 185–189)

      Qi Li, Liming Tang, Yu Xia and Botian Li

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200628

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      A novel, facile fabrication method of polymer tubes is presented: using methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) self-assembled fibers as both the template and monomer source, the MBA polymer microtubes are obtained via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The dissolved MBA molecules polymerize into layers surrounding the fibers and the layers serve as the frameworks of the polymer tubes. Thereafter, the fibers continuously dissolve and polymerize onto the frameworks until the fibers all transform into polymer tubes.

    10. Carbohydrates as Additives for the Formation of Isoporous PS-b-P4VP Diblock Copolymer Membranes (pages 190–194)

      Juliana Isabel Clodt, Sofia Rangou, Anne Schröder, Kristian Buhr, Janina Hahn, Adina Jung, Volkan Filiz and Volker Abetz

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201200680

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      Polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) diblock copolymer membranes are prepared using α-cyclodextrine, α-(D)-glucose and conventional saccharose as additives for the membrane formation of three different PS-b-P4VP polymers. In all cases, the membranes made from solution with carbohydrates have more pores, a better pore size distribution on the surface and show a higher water flux compared with membranes prepared without carbohydrates.

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