Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 35 Issue 14

July 2014

Volume 35, Issue 14

Pages 1233–1305

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
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      Macromol. Rapid Commun. 14/2014 (page 1233)

      Jie Dong, Ruichen Zhang, Hao Wu, Xiaowei Zhan, Huai Yang, Siquan Zhu and Guojie Wang

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201470045

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      Front Cover: Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles that can respond to visible light and pH have been prepared from perylene-functionalized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate). The controlled release of Nile Red and lysozyme from the nanoparticles stimulated by visible light and pH separately and synergistically is demonstrated. The polymer nanoparticles can be used as smart nanocarriers and could find applications in nanosciences and biotechnologies. Further information can be found in the article by J. Dong, R. Zhang, H. Wu, X. Zhan, H. Yang, S. Zhu, and G. Wang* on page 1255.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 14/2014 (page 1308)

      Yin-Mei Wang, Xiao-Jie Ju, Zhuang Liu, Rui Xie, Wei Wang, Jiang-Feng Wu, Yan-Qiong Zhang and Liang-Yin Chu

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201470048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-12-crown-4-acrylamide) (PNB12C4) copolymer can recognize and respond to both γ-CD and Na+ based on the B12C4 role transformation between host and guest units. When γ-CD and Na+ coexist with PNB12C4, competitive complexation actions of B12C4 toward γ-CD and Na+ finally form an equilibrium of 2:2:1 γ-CD/B12C4/Na+ composite complex regardless of the complexation order, and PNB12C4 copolymer finally reaches the same equilibrium state. Further details can be found in the article by Y. M. Wang, X. J. Ju,* Z. Liu, R. Xie, W. Wang, J. F. Wu, Y. Q. Zhang, and L. Y. Chu on page 1280.

  3. Masthead

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    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
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    1. Masthead: Macromol. Rapid Commun. 14/2014

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201470046

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    1. Contents: Macromol. Rapid Commun. 14/2014 (pages 1235–1237)

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201470047

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    1. Isocyanate- and Phosgene-Free Routes to Polyfunctional Cyclic Carbonates and Green Polyurethanes by Fixation of Carbon Dioxide (pages 1238–1254)

      Hannes Blattmann, Maria Fleischer, Moritz Bähr and Rolf Mülhaupt

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400209

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      Exploiting carbon dioxide as feedstock for polyfunctional cyclic carbonates affords a versatile molecular tool box for producing linear and cross-linked non-isocyanate polyurethanes (NIPUs) with unconventional architectures. This green route to NIPUs holds great promise with respect to tailoring coatings, adhesives, sealants, foams as well as bio-based polyurethanes, and biocompatible and bio-functional NIPUs for biomedical applications.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    1. Polymer Nanoparticles for Controlled Release Stimulated by Visible Light and pH (pages 1255–1259)

      Jie Dong, Ruichen Zhang, Hao Wu, Xiaowei Zhan, Huai Yang, Siquan Zhu and Guojie Wang

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles that can respond to visible light and pH have been prepared from perylene-functionalized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate). The controlled release of Nile Red and lysozyme from the nanoparticles stimulated by visible light and pH separately and synergistically is demonstrated. The polymer nanoparticles can be used as smart nanocarriers and could find applications in nanosciences and biotechnologies.

    2. Morphing Hydrogel Patterns by Thermo-Reversible Fluorescence Switching (pages 1260–1265)

      Erhan Bat, En-Wei Lin, Sina Saxer and Heather D. Maynard

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400160

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      Stimuli-responsive surfaces that show reversible fluorescence switching behavior in response to temperature changes are presented. Fluorophore-conjugated hydrogel thin films are bright when the gels are swollen; upon collapsing of the gels, self-quenching of fluorophores leads to significant attenuation of fluorescence. Morphing surfaces are obtained by patterning multiple stimuli-responsive polymers using electron beam lithography.

    3. Photoinduced Bending Behavior of Cross-linked Azobenzene Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Films with a Poly(oxyethylene) Backbone (pages 1266–1272)

      Jiu-an Lv, Weiru Wang, Jixiang Xu, Tomiki Ikeda and Yanlei Yu

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400112

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      A splayed alignment of azobenzene moieties is generated in cross-linked liquid-crystalline polymer films with a poly(oxyethylene) backbone prepared by photoinitiated cationic polymerization with unpolarized light at 436 nm and results in a reversible photoinduced bending with opposite bending directions when different surfaces of one film faced to ultraviolet light irradiation.

    4. Engineering Aqueous Fiber Assembly into Silk-Elastin-Like Protein Polymers (pages 1273–1279)

      Like Zeng, Linan Jiang, Weibing Teng, Joseph Cappello, Yitshak Zohar and Xiaoyi Wu

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400058

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      Silk-elastin-like protein polymers are capable of self-assembling into nanofibers in aqueous solutions. The self-assembly of silk-elastin nanofibers can be tuned by the assembling temperature of protein solutions, the size of the silk blocks, and the charges of the elastin blocks. A core-sheath model is proposed for the process of silk-elastin nanofiber formation.

    5. Competitive Molecular-/Ion-Recognition Responsive Characteristics of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-12-crown-4-acrylamide) Copolymers with Benzo-12-crown-4 as Both Guest and Host Units (pages 1280–1286)

      Yin-Mei Wang, Xiao-Jie Ju, Zhuang Liu, Rui Xie, Wei Wang, Jiang-Feng Wu, Yan-Qiong Zhang and Liang-Yin Chu

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400054

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-12-crown-4-acrylamide) (PNB12C4) copoly­mer can recognize and respond to both γ-CD and Na+ based on B12C4 role transformation between host and guest units. When γ-CD and Na+ coexist with PNB12C4, competitive complexing actions of B12C4 toward γ-CD and Na+ finally form a equilibrium 2:2:1 γ-CD/B12C4/Na+ composite complex regardless of the complexation order, and PNB12C4 copolymer finally reaches the same equilibrium state.

    6. Spatial Control over Brush Growth through Sunlight-Induced Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Using Dye-Sensitized TiO2 as a Photocatalyst (pages 1287–1292)

      Bin Li, Bo Yu and Feng Zhou

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400121

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      Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization is induced by in situ photo-generation of the CuI/L activator complex from the higher oxidation state of CuII/L deactivator complex using dye sensitized titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The powerful consequence of this photo method is the ability to spatially and temporally control brush growth in one single step. Patterns with sub-50 nm resolution are obtained.

    7. Redox-Switchable Supramolecular Graft Polymer Formation via Ferrocene–Cyclodextrin Assembly (pages 1293–1300)

      Florian Szillat, Bernhard V. K. J. Schmidt, Artur Hubert, Christopher Barner-Kowollik and Helmut Ritter

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400122

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      The combination of a CD-terminated host-polymer and a ferrocene (Fc)-containing lateral guest copolymer in aqueous solution leads to the formation of supramolecular brush polymers with distinct redox-switchable behavior. The amphiphilic Fc-containing copolymers feature the possibility to form micelle-like aggregates whereas cloud-like nanostructures are formed upon the addition of CD-functionalized guest polymer.

    8. Solvent-Free Fabrication of polyHIPE Microspheres for Controlled Release of Growth Factors (pages 1301–1305)

      Robert Moglia, Michael Whitely, Megan Brooks, Jennifer Robinson, Michael Pishko and Elizabeth Cosgriff-Hernandez

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201400145

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High porosity microspheres are fabricated without solvent for the controlled release of growth factors. The advantages of these microspheres are twofold: solvent-free methodology is expected to reduce production and treatment costs; independent tuning of particle size and microarchitecture provides excellent control of release kinetics.

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