Linear ion traps in mass spectrometry

Authors

  • Donald J. Douglas,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada
    • Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada.
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  • Aaron J. Frank,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada
    Current affiliation:
    1. Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201
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  • Dunmin Mao

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada
    Current affiliation:
    1. Covance Laboratories, Inc., 3301 Kinsman Boulevard, Madison, WI 53704
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Abstract

  I.Introduction000
 II.Linear Multipoles000
 A.  Multipole Fields000
     1.  Multipole Potentials000
     2.  Ion Motion in 2D Multipole Fields000
     3.  Ion Motion in Quadrupole Fields000
     4.  Ion Motion in Higher Multipole Fields000
     5.  Linear Ion Guides, Collision Cells, and Traps000
     6.  Collisional Cooling000
     7.  Ion Excitation in the Presence of a Collision Gas000
     8.  Ion Isolation000
     9.  Trap Capacity000
 A.  Mass Discrimination Effects000
  III.Linear Traps Combined with Other Mass Analyzers000
 A.  Linear Traps Combined with 3D Paul Traps000
 B.  Linear Ion Traps Combined with TOF Mass Analyzers000
 C.  Linear Traps Combined with FTICR000
 IV.Linear Traps as Mass Spectrometers000
 A.  Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap000
 B.  Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Radial Ion Ejection000
 C.  Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Axial Ejection000
  V.Summary and Outlook000
Acknowledgments000
List of Symbols000
References000

Linear ion traps are finding new applications in many areas of mass spectrometry. In a linear ion trap, ions are confined radially by a two-dimensional (2D) radio frequency (RF) field, and axially by stopping potentials applied to end electrodes. This review focuses on linear ion trap instrumentation. Potentials and ion motion in linear multipole fields and methods of ion trapping, cooling, excitation, and isolation are described. This is followed by a description of various mass discrimination effects that have been reported with linear ion traps. Linear ion traps combined in various ways with three-dimensional (3D) traps, time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyzers, and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers are then given. Linear ion traps can be used as stand alone mass analyzers, and their use for mass analysis by Fourier transforming image currents, by mass selective radial ejection, and by mass selective axial ejection are reviewed. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev

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