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MicrobiologyOpen

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 6

December 2013

Volume 2, Issue 6

Pages i–ii, 893–1023

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
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      Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.149

  2. Original Research

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Original Research
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic bacteria (pages 893–900)

      Thierry Nadalig, Markus Greule, Françoise Bringel, Stéphane Vuilleumier and Frank Keppler

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.124

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      In this study, we measured hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation of the remaining untransformed chloromethane following its degradation by methylotrophic bacterial strains Methylobacterium extorquens CM4 and Hyphomicrobium sp. MC1, which belong to different genera but both use the only pathway for bacterial degradation of chloromethane described so far. Hydrogen isotope fractionation for degradation of chloromethane was determined for the first time, and yielded enrichment factors (ε) of −29‰ and −27‰ for strains CM4 and MC1 respectively.

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      Nitrite impacts the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in response to isoniazid and hydrogen peroxide (pages 901–911)

      Amy Cunningham-Bussel, Franz C. Bange and Carl F. Nathan

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.126

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      We document the novel observation that the mycobacterial respiratory product, nitrite, dramatically enhances the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis treated with isoniazid and synergizes with hydrogen peroxide to effect killing.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The cytoplasmic PASC domain of the sensor kinase DcuS of Escherichia coli: role in signal transduction, dimer formation, and DctA interaction (pages 912–927)

      Christian Monzel, Pia Degreif-Dünnwald, Christina Gröpper, Christian Griesinger and Gottfried Unden

      Version of Record online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.127

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      The cytoplasmic PAS domain (PASC) of the fumarate senor kinase DcuS of Escherichia coli is involved in signal transfer to the kinase and in interaction with the cosensing transporter DctA. Functional ON mutations of PASC were characterized that affect PASC/PASC dimer and PASC/DctA interaction, and simulate stimulation by fumarate binding at fumarate site. A model for the role of PASC in signal transfer and control of DcuS activity is presented.

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      Molecular analysis of the UV-inducible pili operon from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius (pages 928–937)

      Marleen van Wolferen, Małgorzata Ajon, Arnold J. M. Driessen and Sonja-Verena Albers

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.128

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      In this study we provide an in-depth analysis of the UV-inducible pili system of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius which is used as a community-based DNA repair system. Except for UpsX, all other components of the ups pili are essential for pili formation and DNA exchange.

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      Symbiotic prokaryotic communities from different populations of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta (pages 938–952)

      Cara L. Fiore, Jessica K. Jarett and Michael P. Lesser

      Version of Record online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.135

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      The symbiotic prokaryotic community composition of the sponge Xestospongia muta was significantly different from the water column and differed in the relative abundance of certain symbiotic taxa for sponges from different locations. Overall, X. muta sponges harbored a diverse community of bacteria and archaea and that was specific to the sponge habitat and may be important in nutrient cycling in the sponge and on the coral reef.

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      Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations (pages 953–961)

      Mélanie Hillion, Lily Mijouin, Thomas Jaouen, Magalie Barreau, Pauline Meunier, Luc Lefeuvre, Elian Lati, Sylvie Chevalier and Marc G. J. Feuilloley

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.138

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      This manuscript is the first in which the possible differences in bacterial communities between normal and sensitive skin have been investigated. Aerobic cultivable skin bacteria were identified par mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis associated with the sensitive skin syndrome.

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      The Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa type III secretion system is expressed during infections both in vitro and in vivo (pages 962–975)

      Zachary W. Bent, Steven S. Branda and Glenn M. Young

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.136

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      The Yersinia enterocolitica Ysa type III secretion system (T3SS) has previously been shown to be expressed in vitro under conditions that would not suggest a role during mammalian infection. In this study, we demonstrate that the Ysa T3SS is expressed in a contact-dependent manner during the in vitro infection of human epithelial cells under physiologically relevant conditions. In addition, we show that the system is expressed in a murine model throughout the course of an infection in all tissues examined.

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      Canonical and non-canonical EcfG sigma factors control the general stress response in Rhizobium etli (pages 976–987)

      Ann Jans, Maarten Vercruysse, Shanjun Gao, Kristof Engelen, Ivo Lambrichts, Maarten Fauvart and Jan Michiels

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.137

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      This study explores the hierarchical relation between Rhizobium etli extracytoplasmic function sigma factors σEcfG1 and σEcfG2, core components of the general stress response (GSR). We propose a modified model for GSR regulation in R. etli as we find that, contrary to reports in other species, σEcfG1 and σEcfG2 act in parallel, as nodes of a complex regulatory network, rather than in series, as elements of a linear regulatory cascade. Based on a phylogenetic analysis and considering the prevalence of α-proteobacterial genomes with multiple σEcfG copies, this model may also be applicable to numerous other species.

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      Spoligotyping and drug resistance patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from five provinces of Iran (pages 988–996)

      Mehri Haeili, Davood Darban-Sarokhalil, Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi, Sedigheh Javadpour, Abdorrazagh Hashemi, Farideh Siavoshi and Mohammad Mehdi Feizabadi

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.139

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      Spoligotyping was used to study the diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates collected from five different provinces of the country. Ural, CAS, and T families were the major lineages of our study population. CAS and T families showed biogeographic specificity to border provinces of Iran suggested that this family strains might be transmitted from these regions to other provinces of the country.

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      The rhizosphere microbial community in a multiple parallel mineralization system suppresses the pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum (pages 997–1009)

      Kazuki Fujiwara, Yuichiro Iida, Takashi Iwai, Chihiro Aoyama, Ryuya Inukai, Akinori Ando, Jun Ogawa, Jun Ohnishi, Fumihiro Terami, Masao Takano and Makoto Shinohara

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.140

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      The rhizosphere microbial community in a hydroponics system with multiple parallel mineralization (MPM) can potentially suppress root-borne diseases. This study focused on the suppression of Fusarium wilt disease caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Our data indicated that the microbiota suppresses the disease by controlling the pathogen's morphogenesis and by developing an ecosystem that permits coexistence with F. oxysporum.

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      Developing an international Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference panel (pages 1010–1023)

      Anthony De Soyza, Amanda J. Hall, Eshwar Mahenthiralingam, Pavel Drevinek, Wieslaw Kaca, Zuzanna Drulis-Kawa, Stoyanka R. Stoitsova, Veronika Toth, Tom Coenye, James E. A. Zlosnik, Jane L. Burns, Isabel Sá-Correia, Daniel De Vos, Jean-Paul Pirnay, Timothy J. Kidd, David Reid, Jim Manos, Jens Klockgether, Lutz Wiehlmann, Burkhard Tümmler, Siobhán McClean, Craig Winstanley and On behalf ofEU FP7 funded COST Action BM1003 “Cell surface virulence determinants of cystic fibrosis pathogens”

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mbo3.141

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      Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen, especially in relation to cystic fibrosis. We have collated a panel of 43 P. aeruginosa strains designed to reflect the diversity of this pathogen.

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