Dietary differences are reflected on the gut prokaryotic community structure of wild and commercially reared sea bream (Sparus aurata)

Authors

  • Konstantinos A. Kormas,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ichthyology & Aquatic Environment, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, Greece
    • Correspondence

      Konstantinos A. Kormas, Department of Ichthyology & Aquatic Environment, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, 384 46 Volos, Greece. Tel: +30-242-109-3082; Fax: +30-242-109-3157; E-mail: kkormas@uth.gr

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  • Alexandra Meziti,

    1. Department of Ichthyology & Aquatic Environment, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, Greece
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  • Eleni Mente,

    1. Department of Ichthyology & Aquatic Environment, School of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, Greece
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  • Athanasios Frentzos

    1. Kefalonia Fisheries, Livadi, Greece
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Abstract

We compared the gut prokaryotic communities in wild, organically-, and conventionally reared sea bream (Sparus aurata) individuals. Gut microbial communities were identified using tag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. There were distinct prokaryotic communities in the three different fish nutritional treatments, with the bacteria dominating over the Archaea. Most of the Bacteria belonged to the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The number of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was reduced from the wild to the conventionally reared fish, implying a response of the gut microorganisms to the supplied food and possibly alterations in food assimilation. The dominant bacterial OTU in all examined fish was closely related to the genus Diaphorobacter. This is the first time that a member of the β-Proteobacteria, which dominate in freshwaters, are so important in a marine fish gut. In total the majority of the few Archaea OTUs found, were related to methane metabolism. The inferred physiological roles of the dominant prokaryotes are related to the metabolism of carbohydrates and nitrogenous compounds. This study showed the responsive feature of the sea bream gut prokaryotic communities to their diets and also the differences of the conventional in comparison to the organic and wild sea bream gut microbiota.

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