Adult-onset tic disorders

Authors

  • Valsamma Eapen MBBS, DPM, PhD, MRCPsych,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College, London Medical School, London, United Kingdom
    2. Department of Psychiatry, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates
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  • Andrew J. Lees MD, FRCP,

    1. The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, United Kingdom
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  • J.P.W.F. Lakke MD,

    1. Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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    • Deceased

  • Michael R. Trimble FRCP, FRCPsych,

    1. The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, United Kingdom
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  • Mary M. Robertson MBCHB, DPM, MD, MRCPCH, FRCPsych

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College, London Medical School, London, United Kingdom
    2. The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College, London Medical School, 2nd Floor, Wolfson Building, 48 Riding House Street, London W1N 8AA, United Kingdom
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  • A videotape accompanies this article.

Abstract

We report on 8 patients with adult-onset motor tics and vocalisations. Three had compulsive tendencies in childhood and 3 had a family history of tics or obsessive–compulsive behaviour. In comparison with DSM-classified, younger-onset Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, adult-onset tic disorders are more often associated with severe symptoms, greater social morbidity, a potential trigger event, increased sensitivity, and poorer response to neuroleptic medication. © 2002 Movement Disorder Society

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