Secondary nonresponsiveness to new bulk botulinum toxin A (BCB2024)

Authors

  • Brad A. Racette MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery (Neurology), Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    2. American Parkinson Disease Association Advanced Center for Parkinson Research, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    3. Huntington Disease Society of America Center of Excellence
    • Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8111, St. Louis, MO 63110
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  • Mikula Stambuk MD,

    1. Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery (Neurology), Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
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  • Joel S. Perlmutter MD

    1. Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery (Neurology), Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    2. American Parkinson Disease Association Advanced Center for Parkinson Research, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    3. Huntington Disease Society of America Center of Excellence
    4. Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    5. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
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Abstract

We report on a patient with cranio–cervical dystonia injected with the new, lower protein formulation of botulinum toxin A who developed secondary resistance to this toxin. Subsequent injections with botulinum toxin B provided substantial reduction of blepharospasm. This is the first reported case of secondary resistance to the new preparation of botulinum toxin A. © 2002 Movement Disorder Society

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