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Keywords:

  • CB1 receptors;
  • cannabinoids;
  • L-dopa;
  • dyskinesia;
  • reserpine

Abstract

The present study was designed to determine the potential of CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulating compounds in the treatment of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa)–induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. In the reserpine-treated rat model of parkinsonism, administration of a high dose of L-dopa (150 mg/kg) but not of Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) or quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) produced a hyperkinetic state characterised by an increase in horizontal and vertical activity, which likely represent correlates of antiparkinsonian and dyskinetic activity, respectively. Injection of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716 (0.1–3 mg/kg) reduced the increase in vertical activity elicited by L-dopa without affecting the increase in horizontal activity. Injection of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (0.1–3 mg/kg) reduced the L-dopa–induced increase in vertical activity and, at the highest dose only (3 mg/kg), also reduced horizontal activity elicited by L-dopa. WIN55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) reduced motor activity induced by both the D1 receptor agonist Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) and the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. SR141716 (1 mg/kg) had no effects on motor activity induced by Cl-APB (0.5 mg/kg) nor quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. Injection of the inhibitor of endocannabinoid transport AM404 (0.1–1 mg/kg) did not affect the increase in horizontal or vertical activity elicited by L-dopa (150 mg/kg) in the reserpine-treated rat. The data suggest that both CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonists and agonists can modulate the behavioural effects of L-dopa and may be useful for the treatment of the dyskinesia associated with long-term L-dopa treatment of Parkinson's disease. © 2002 Movement Disorder Society