Olfactory bulb in multiple system atrophy

Authors

  • Tibor Kovács MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University, Faculty of General Medicine, Budapest, Hungary
    2. Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University, Faculty of General Medicine, Budapest, Balassa u. 6., H-1083 Hungary
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  • Mátyás I. Papp MD, DSc,

    1. Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University, Faculty of General Medicine, Budapest, Hungary
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  • Nigel J. Cairns PhD,

    1. Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London, United Kingdom
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  • M. Nadeem Khan MSc,

    1. MRC Neurodegenerative Diseases Brain Bank, Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom
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  • Peter L. Lantos MD, DSc, FRCPath

    1. Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Olfactory dysfunction is a characteristic clinical sign in Parkinson's disease (PD); it is also present in multiple system atrophy (MSA). The pathological basis of hyposmia or anosmia in PD is well known: the olfactory bulb (OB) contains numerous Lewy bodies and severe neuronal loss is present in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON). We established that glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) are present in all the OBs from MSA cases. Their presence in the OB is diagnostic for MSA. Additionally, neuronal loss is present in the AON in MSA. These pathological changes might be responsible for the olfactory dysfunction seen in MSA. © 2003 Movement Disorder Society

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