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Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for advanced PD: Correlation of intraoperative MER and postoperative MRI with neuropathological findings

Authors

  • George J. Counelis MD,

    1. Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Tanya Simuni MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Mark S. Forman MD, PhD,

    1. Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Jurg L. Jaggi PhD,

    1. Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • John Q. Trojanowski MD, PhD,

    1. Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Gordon H. Baltuch MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    • Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
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Abstract

This postmortem study correlated intraoperative subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) placement and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with autopsy findings in a patient who died suddenly 4 days postoperatively from a pulmonary embolism. The study demonstrates that (1) MRI stereotactic localization combined with microelectrode recording (MER) is an accurate way to target STN; (2) multiple MER tracts do not cause significant injury to the brain; and (3) postoperative MRI accurately demonstrates location of the DBS electrodes. © 2003 Movement Disorder Society

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