Abnormal sensorimotor integration is related to disease severity in Parkinson's disease: A TMS study

Authors

  • Stefano Tamburin MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Neurological Rehabilitation, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
    2. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Clinical Neurology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
    3. “Pederzoli” Hospital, Peschiera, Verona, Italy
    • Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche e della Visione, Sezione di Neurologia, Ospedale Policlinico G.B. Rossi, piazzale Scuro, 37134 Verona, Italy
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  • Antonio Fiaschi MD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Neurological Rehabilitation, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
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  • Domenico Idone MD,

    1. “Pederzoli” Hospital, Peschiera, Verona, Italy
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  • Piergiorgio Lochner MD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Clinical Neurology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
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  • Paolo Manganotti MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Neurological Rehabilitation, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
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  • Giampietro Zanette MD

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, Section of Clinical Neurology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
    2. “Pederzoli” Hospital, Peschiera, Verona, Italy
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Abstract

Hyperexcitability of the motor system has been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluate how cutaneous afferents modulate motor excitability in PD patients and whether abnormal modulation is correlated to parkinsonian symptoms. Digital stimulation causes abnormal enhancement of motor responses in patients. This effect may be one of the features of motor hyperexcitability in PD. Cutaneomotor hyperexcitability correlates with clinical scores, suggesting that abnormal processing of cutaneous inputs might contribute to the pathogenesis of parkinsonian symptoms. © 2003 Movement Disorder Society

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