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Late-life action tremor in a southern sea otter (enhydris lutris nereis)

Authors

  • Elan D. Louis MD, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
    3. Taub Institute for Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
    • Unit 198, Neurological Institute, 710 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032
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  • Michael J. Murray DVM,

    1. Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey, California, USA
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  • Melissa A. Miller DVM, PhD,

    1. Department of Fish and Game, University of California, Davis, California, USA
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  • Seth L. Pullman MD, FRCPC,

    1. Department of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
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  • Jean Paul G. Vonsattel MD

    1. Taub Institute for Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
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  • A videotape accompanies this article.

Abstract

Although tremor is highly prevalent in human beings, there are few reports of tremor occurring in other mammals. Such tremor can further our insight into the mechanisms and anatomical basis of human tremor disorders. We report on a southern sea otter with a slowly progressive 6.5 to 8.5 Hz action tremor of late life that shared several clinical characteristics with essential tremor. The main pathological finding was in the cerebellum, where there was extensive vacuolation of Purkinje cells. © 2003 Movement Disorder Society

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