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Cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine in Parkinson's disease patients

Authors

  • Nicola Pavese MD,

    1. MRC Clinical Science Center and Division of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College. Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom
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  • Ornella Rimoldi MD,

    1. MRC Clinical Science Center and Division of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College. Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom
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  • Alexander Gerhard MD,

    1. MRC Clinical Science Center and Division of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College. Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom
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  • David J. Brooks MD, DSc,

    1. MRC Clinical Science Center and Division of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College. Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom
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  • Paola Piccini MD

    Corresponding author
    1. MRC Clinical Science Center and Division of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College. Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom
    • Cyclotron Building, Hammersmith Hospital, DuCane Road, London W12 00N United Kingdom
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Abstract

Cardiovascular responses after intravenous methamphetamine were assessed in 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored for 103 minutes. After methamphetamine administration, SBP and DBP increased significantly in both PD and normal controls whereas placebo had no effect. In PD patients, however, the duration of SBP and DBP responses to methamphetamine and the maximum increase from baseline was attenuated compared with the controls. A significant correlation was found between individual BP responsiveness and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score. These findings suggest that in PD there is impairment of catecholamine release from peripheral sympathetic presynaptic terminals, which correlates with motor impairment. © 2003 Movement Disorder Society

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