SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. References

The original article to which this Letter refers was published in the August issue of Movement DisordersMov Disord 2003;18(8):928–932.

In the August issue of Movement Disorders, Cochen and colleagues cited Brownell et al.1 in reference to DAT ligand binding and the implantation of mesencephalic cells in the striatum. Although this does not alter the general meaning of the discussion, the citation as it stands is inaccurate, and a revised paragraph is printed below (see text in boldface).

Although this result might be related to a lack of sensitivity of the DAT ligand used in our study, we believe this explanation is in contradiction with the results we obtained in patients with early PD.5 In addition, the validity of DAT ligand binding to assess neural transplantation in PD should be addressed in patients grafted with more fetal donors and having a more consistent clinical improvement. On the other hand, in MPTP-treated monkeys, a 6% increase of the binding of a DAT ligand was reported after a graft occupying 35% of the putamen.18In 6-OHDA lesioned rats, the binding of a DAT ligand increased by 50% after implanting in the striatum ∼400,000 mesencephalic cells, from which on average 1,324 TH+ cells survived.19 In addition, some authors have reported the lack of 123I-labeled -CIT binding in the grafts implanted in the putamen of 6-hydroxydopaminne-lesioned rats, despite the local increase of dopamine transporter mRNA.20 Therefore, DAT ligands seem less sensitive than [18F]fluorodopa for revealing the changes after fetal grafts. The proportionally more important changes in [18F]fluorodopa than in DAT ligand might be related to a metabolic hyperactivity (i.e., dopa-decarboxylase activity) in the grafted putamen. This hyperactivity could be responsible for the functional improvement of grafted PD patients, considering that [18F]fluorodopa uptake, unlike [76Br]-FE-CBT BP, is highly correlated with motor symptoms in nongrafted PD patients.

The authors apologize for this error.

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. References