Partial lesion of thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus after chronic high-frequency stimulation

Authors

  • Jasmine Henderson PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    2. Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick, Australia
    3. University of New South Wales, Kensington, Australia
    • Department of Pharmacology, Room 211e, Bosch Building, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
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  • Michael Rodriguez FRCPA,

    1. Department of Forensic Medicine, Central Sydney Area Health Service, Glebe, Australia
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  • Dudley O'Sullivan FRACP,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service, Darlinghurst, Australia
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  • Malcolm Pell FRACS,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service, Darlinghurst, Australia
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  • Victor Fung PhD, FRACP,

    1. Department of Neurology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Australia
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  • Alim Louis Benabid MD, PhD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service, Darlinghurst, Australia
    2. Neurosciences Department, Joseph Fourier University, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Grenoble, France
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  • Glenda Halliday PhD

    1. Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick, Australia
    2. University of New South Wales, Kensington, Australia
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Abstract

A 73-year-old man with Parkinson's disease underwent thalamic stimulation for disabling tremor with excellent results only when stimulation on. Post-mortem neuropathology (7 years postoperatively) revealed 60% cell loss within 0.5 mm of the electrode tip. Tremor improvement was attributable to chronic stimulation, not microthalamotomy. © 2004 Movement Disorder Society

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