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Home alone: Methods to maximize tic expression for objective videotape assessments in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

Authors

  • Christopher G. Goetz,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University, Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Sue Leurgans,

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University, Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Teresa A. Chmura

    1. Department of Neurological Sciences and Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University, Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Presented at the American Neurological Association, October 1999, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

Our objective was to test whether at-home videotapes yield enhanced information on tics compared to office-based videotapes and a patient questionnaire on the current anatomical distribution of tics. Ten subjects with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (age range 8–49 years) who were seen for initial evaluation completed a check list of anatomical areas currently affected with tics, and underwent a videotape examination according to the Rush Videotape Protocol. Each patient/family conducted the same protocol at home at the same time of day within 48 hours. We rated two tapes in random order using the modified published scoring method for the Rush Video-based Tic Rating Scale. Two environments were compared, the doctor's office and at home, with videotapes taken in three conditions: patient engaged in relaxed conversation, patient quietly seated with filmer in the room, and patient quietly seated alone in the room. Data were analyzed using a 2-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Wilcoxon signed rank tests.

All patients provided excellent quality videotapes that could be scored without difficulty. Environment (office vs. home) and Condition (conversation, quiet with observer, quiet and alone) were both highly significant (P < .0001) and did not interact (P = .54). The highest tic scores for total tic impairment occurred at home with the patient alone (mean score 14.5), and the lowest yield occurred in the office with an observer present (mean score 5.4), the setting closest to the clinical neurological examination. The Home/Alone video segments revealed tics not otherwise seen. Patient questionnaires on body regions recorded more areas than observed in the office videotape, but patients were unaware of several tics captured on the Home/Alone segment.

Patients can produce videotapes for objective tic assessments. Because at-home videotapes consistently yield higher tic expressions than in-office films and capture tics that are not appreciated by patients, this methodology is well-suited for enhanced retrieval of objective data on tic expression. © 2001 Movement Disorder Society.

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