Emergence of complex, involuntary movements after gamma knife radiosurgery for essential tremor

Authors

  • Andrew Siderowf MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Lankenau Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    • Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 330 South Ninth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

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  • Stephen M. Gollump MD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Lankenau Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Matthew B. Stern MD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Lankenau Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Gordon H. Baltuch MD, PhD,

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Lankenau Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Howard A. Riina MD

    1. Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Lankenau Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • A videotape accompanies this article.

Abstract

Gamma knife radiosurgery is generally considered a safer alternative to traditional pallidotomy or thalamotomy. We report the case of a 59-year-old patient with essential tremor who developed a complex, disabling movement disorder following gamma knife thalamotomy. This case illustrates the need for long-term follow-up to fully evaluate the potential for complications following radiosurgery. © 2001 Movement Disorder Society.

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