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Amantadine for levodopa-induced choreic dyskinesia in compound heterozygotes for GCH1 mutations

Authors

  • Yoshiaki Furukawa MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Disorders Research Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health-Clarke Division, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Movement Disorders Research Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health—Clarke Division, 250 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada
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  • James J. Filiano MD,

    1. Department of Pediatrics/Neurology, Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA
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  • Stephen J. Kish PhD

    1. Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health—Clarke Division, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Abstract

Amantadine suppressed severe levodopa-induced choreic dyskinesia, which developed at initiation of levodopa therapy, in two siblings manifesting dystonia with motor delay phenotype of GTP cyclohydrolase I deficiency caused by compound heterozygous GCH1 mutations. Our finding suggests a beneficial effect of amantadine on this type of dyskinesia frequently observed in relatively severe dopamine-deficient metabolic disorders. © 2004 Movement Disorder Society

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