Parkinsonism in the course of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy

Authors

  • Marzia Puccioni-Sohler MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Neurology Service, ESP/Hospital Universitáro Gaffree Guinle (HUGG/UniRio), University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Laboratory/Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Neurolife Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • Rua de Zenove de Fevereiro 185/705, 2280-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
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  • Regina Papais-Alvarenga MD, PhD,

    1. Neurology Service, ESP/Hospital Universitáro Gaffree Guinle (HUGG/UniRio), University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Priscila Mesquita de Souza,

    1. Neurology Service, ESP/Hospital Universitáro Gaffree Guinle (HUGG/UniRio), University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Silvia Curi de França,

    1. Neurology Service, ESP/Hospital Universitáro Gaffree Guinle (HUGG/UniRio), University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Reizer Reis Gonçalves,

    1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Laboratory/Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Neurolife Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • Steven Jacobson PhD

    1. Neuroimmunology Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • This work was presented at the 11th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Viruses, June 9–12, 2003, San Francisco, CA.

Abstract

Parkinsonian syndromes may represent a complication of viral infection. Human T cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I) is a cause of a chronic myelopathy in which encephalic involvement has been also found. We report on the case of a 60-year-old man with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, complicated with bradykinesia, resting tremor, and cogwheel rigidity. These findings suggest that parkinsonian features may represent a neurological disorder associated with HTLV-I infection. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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