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Open-label pilot study of levetiracetam (Keppra) for the treatment of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Theresa A. Zesiewicz MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    • University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MDC Box 55, Tampa, FL 33612
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  • Kelly L. Sullivan MSPH,

    1. Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
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  • John L. Maldonado BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    2. College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
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  • William O. Tatum DO,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
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  • Robert A. Hauser MD

    1. Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
    3. Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
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Abstract

We evaluated the tolerability and preliminary efficacy of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra) in reducing levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease (PD) in an open-label pilot study. Nine PD patients who were experiencing peak-dose dyskinesias for at least 25% of the awake day and were at least moderately disabling were treated with LEV in doses up to 3,000 mg for up to 60 days. The primary outcome measure was the percent of the awake day that patients spent on without dyskinesia or with nontroublesome dyskinesia (good on time). The mean dose of LEV at endpoint was 625 ± 277 mg/day. LEV significantly improved percent of the awake day on without dyskinesia or with nontroublesome dyskinesia at endpoint compared to baseline (43% ± 12% vs. 61% ± 17%; P = 0.02). Percent on time with troublesome dyskinesia decreased from 23% ± 10% at baseline to 11% ± 6% at endpoint, although not significantly. There was no significant increase in off time from baseline to endpoint. There was a 56% dropout rate, mostly due to somnolence. In PD patients who experienced peak-dose dyskinesia for at least 25% of the awake day, LEV significantly improved on time without dyskinesia or with nontroublesome dyskinesia. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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