Analysis of the relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with Parkinson's disease

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Abstract

To analyze the correlation between muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we measured both parameters in 14 PD patients who were 51 to 82 years of age (mean, 63.1 ± 8.7 years). The duration of PD was 2 to 26 years, and the disability level (modified Hoehn and Yahr stage) ranged from 2.0 to 4.0 (mean, 3.2 ± 0.5). MSNA was recorded from the peroneal nerve fascicles using microneurographic methods, and then cardiac MIBG scintigraphy was performed within 1 month. We analyzed the correlation between the standardized MSNA, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value based on control subject data, and the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) or washout ratio (WR) from early and delayed MIBG images. The relationships between disease duration or disability and MSNA, the H/M ratio, or the WR were also analyzed. No significant correlations were found between MSNA and H/M ratio or WR. Although MSNA was inversely correlated with disease duration and with disability level, neither the H/M ratio nor the WR showed a significant correlation with disease duration or disability level. Because MSNA and MIBG abnormalities were not related, functional changes in addition to organic changes in cardiac sympathetic nerve endings may result in abnormal uptake of MIBG in Parkinson's disease. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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