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Neuroleptic-induced acute and chronic akathisia: A clinical comparison

Authors

  • Jong-Hoon Kim MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon Medical School, Incheon, South Korea
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  • Young-Ho Jin MD,

    1. Bugok National Mental Hospital, Kyungnam, South Korea
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  • Ung Gu Kang MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Yong Min Ahn MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    2. Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Kyoo-Seob Ha MD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    2. Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
    3. Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Kyunggi-do, South Korea
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  • Yong Sik Kim MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
    2. Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea
    • Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul, 110-744, South Korea
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Abstract

We compared the severity of subjective and objective symptomatology of akathisia between the acute and chronic subtypes of neuroleptic-induced akathisia. Sixty-one schizophrenic subjects were evaluated. Multivariate analysis revealed that motor manifestations and distress of akathisia were less severe in chronic akathisia than in acute akathisia. The severity of subjective restlessness was not significantly different between the two groups. In conclusion, there were differences in the severity of symptoms and signs between the acute and chronic subtypes of akathisia, suggesting that the severity of the subjective and objective components of akathisia may be differentially affected by the duration of akathisia. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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