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Case of symptomatic propriospinal myoclonus evolving toward acute “myoclonic status”

Authors

  • Mauro Manconi MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
    • Department of Neurology, IRCCS San Raffaele-Turro, Via Stamira d'Ancona 20, 20127 Milan, Italy
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  • Barbara Sferrazza MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
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  • Sandro Iannaccone MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
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  • Antonio Massimo,

    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
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  • Marco Zucconi MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
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  • Luigi Ferini-Strambi MD

    1. Department of Neurology, Vita-Salute University, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) San Raffaele-Turro, Milan, Italy
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Abstract

Propriospinal myoclonus is a rare motor disorder consisting of involuntary spinal-generated muscular jerks. Here, we report a severe and uncommon case of propriospinal myoclonus that appeared after a vertebral fracture of T11. In this patient, the polysomnographic investigation showed continuing focal myoclonic activity in axial muscles during stable sleep and an acute progression into a myoclonic “status” associated with respiratory failure and loss of consciousness. It is necessary to consider this severe progression and support it with prompt emergency maneuvers and adequate pharmacotherapy. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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