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Comparison of motor, cognitive, and behavioral features in progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Nicholas J. Cordato PhD, FRACP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Westmead Hospital and the University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
    2. Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • Department of Geriatric Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia
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  • Glenda M. Halliday PhD,

    1. Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Diana Caine PhD,

    1. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Westmead Hospital and the University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
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  • John G.L. Morris FRACP, DM

    1. Department of Neurology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
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Abstract

Major clinical features and global measures were systematically evaluated and compared in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to gaze palsy and early postural instability in PSP, absence of levodopa-induced dyskinesia, frontalis muscle overactivity, primitive reflexes, visuospatial impairment, and substantial frontal behavioral disturbances differentiated almost all patients with this disorder from PD. For PSP, behavioral changes related to severity of general disability, thereby challenging previous models of relationships between behavior, motor, and cognitive disturbance for this disorder. © 2005 Movement Disorder Society

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