Get access

Glutamate release inhibition ineffective in Levodopa-induced motor complications

Authors

  • William Bara-Jimenez MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    • Building 10, Room 5C103, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tzvetelina D. Dimitrova MD,

    1. Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Abdullah Sherzai MD,

    1. Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Murat Aksu MD,

    1. Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas N. Chase MD

    1. Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Reported benefits of various glutamatergic receptor antagonists in Parkinson's disease (PD) prompted an evaluation of the antidyskinetic effect of a putative glutamate release inhibitor in 15 moderately advanced patients. In a 3-week, double-blind, proof-of-concept study, riluzole (200 mg/day) failed to alter parkinsonian or levodopa-induced motor complication severity. Opposing effects of a generalized inhibition of glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission may limit the usefulness of this approach to treat PD. © 2006 Movement Disorder Society

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary