Lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are associated with Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Xuemei Huang MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    • Department of Neurology, 3104 Bioinformatics Building, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
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  • Honglei Chen MD, PhD,

    1. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
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  • William C. Miller MD, PhD, MPH,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Richard B. Mailman PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    2. Department of Pharmacology, Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    3. Department of Psychiatry, Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    4. Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Jennifer L. Woodard BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Peter C. Chen BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Dong Xiang MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Richard W. Murrow MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Yi-Zhe Wang MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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  • Charles Poole MPH, ScD

    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
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Abstract

The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε2 allele has been associated with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). We tested the hypothesis that lower LDL-C may be associated with PD. This case–control study used fasting lipid profiles obtained from 124 PD cases and 112 controls. The PD cases were recruited from consecutive cases presenting at our tertiary Movement Disorder Clinic, and the controls were recruited from the spouse populations of the same clinic. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from unconditional logistic regressions, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and use of cholesterol-lowering agents. Lower LDL-C concentrations were associated with a higher occurrence of PD. Compared with participants with the highest LDL-C (≥138 mg/dL), the OR was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9–5.1) for participants with LDL-C of 115 to 137, 3.5 (95% CI = 1.6–8.1) for LDL-C of 93 to 114, and 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1–5.9) for LDL-C of ≤ 92. Interestingly, use of either cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins alone, was related to lower PD occurrence. Thus, our data provide preliminary evidence that low LDL-C may be associated with higher occurrence of PD, and/or that statin use may lower PD occurrence, either of which finding warrants further investigation. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

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