Predicting the cost of Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Paul McCrone PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. King's College London, Centre for the Economics of Mental Health, Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom
    • PO24 CEMH, Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
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  • Liesl M. Allcock MD,

    1. Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom
    2. Department of Neurology, Royal Hospital, Sunderland, United Kingdom
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  • David J. Burn MD

    1. Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom
    2. Department of Neurology, Royal Hospital, Sunderland, United Kingdom
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Abstract

The degenerative nature of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests that it will lead to high levels of resource use. This study measures service use and costs for a representative community sample of PD patients and identifies cost predictors. Patients were identified from general practices and were interviewed twice, separated by a 12-month interval. Demographic and clinical data on patients were collected and 6-month costs were calculated. Regression analysis was used to identify significant baseline predictors of follow-up costs. The annual service costs (baseline and follow-up combined) were £13,804 per person. Formal service costs accounted for 20% of this figure with informal care from families/friends accounting for 80%. The regression model explained 42% of total follow-up costs and significant predictors included gender (with men having higher costs), disability, and depression. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

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