Effect of age on geriatric depression scale performance in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Daniel Weintraub MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    3. Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    4. Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    • 3535 Market Street, Rm. 3003, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
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  • Kirsten Saboe BA,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    2. Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Matthew B. Stern MD

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
    2. Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC), Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) in nonelderly (<65 years), young-elderly (age, 65–75), and old-elderly (>75 years) patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). 57 nonelderly, 88 young-elderly, and 81 old-elderly PD patients were administered the GDS-15 and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV depression module. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted for GDS-15 scores against a DSM-IV diagnosis of major or minor depression. The discriminant validity of the GDS-15 was high for nonelderly, young-elderly, and old-elderly subjects (ROC area under curve = 0.92, 0.91, and 0.95, respectively), with optimal dichotomization at a cut-off of 4/5 (85% sensitivity and 84% specificity in nonelderly; 89% sensitivity and 82% specificity in young-elderly) and 5/6 (90% sensitivity and 90% specificity in old-elderly). In conclusion, the GDS-15 has comparable validity in younger and older PD patients, suggesting its appropriateness as a depression screening instrument in PD patients of all ages. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

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