The suitability of patient-based measures in the field of Parkinson's disease: A systematic review

Authors

  • Brenda L. Den Oudsten MSc,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology and Health, Medical Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
    • Department Psychology and Health, Medical Psychology, Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Guus L. Van Heck PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology and Health, Medical Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jolanda De Vries PhD

    1. Department of Psychology and Health, Medical Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Medical Psychology, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The aim of this study is to appraise the suitability of current quality of life (QOL) questionnaires for use in the field of Parkinson's disease (PD). Computerized bibliographic databases were screened for publications from 1960 to December 2006. Predefined selection criteria were used to identify QOL questionnaires in PD studies. Two investigators independently assessed and, subsequently, agreed on a set of multidimensional generic and PD-specific QOL questionnaires. Data were extracted concerning the internal structure, reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the included questionnaires. Sixteen-questionnaires were found, of which 14 questionnaires were included (six generic measures and eight PD-specific). In general, the psychometrics of all the questionnaires were adequately described. Sensitivity to change, however, has been reported for only a limited number of instruments. Almost all included questionnaires used QOL as a keyword, but only two questionnaires fitted the broad QOL definition used in this review. Considering the few “real ” QOL questionnaires, we conclude that there is a strong need for such instruments. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

Ancillary