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Test–retest repeatability of assessing environmental and lifestyle factors in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Chun-Wai Yip MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
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  • Eng-King Tan MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    • Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Singapore 169608
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Abstract

Epidemiological studies of environmental risk factors in Parkinson's disease (PD) are dependent on recollection of past exposures based on patients' self-reports. There are limited studies that have assessed the quality of such data. We conducted a prospective study to determine the test–retest repeatability of environmental and lifestyle factors, and medical data in a PD cohort of Asian ethnicity. A total of 150 consecutive PD patients were initially screened, and 100 were recruited and completed an initial interview. Eighty-three patients completed the second interview more than 6 months later. Lifestyle habits (such as smoking and coffee consumption) showed excellent agreement (κ > 0.90). For the amount and duration of coffee, tea, alcohol, and cigarette smoking exposure, the total agreement in the response for these factors in the repeat interview were noted in 71.4%, 73.3%, 100%, and 90%, respectively (ICC > 0.83). Medical conditions for which the patients were on treatment, such as diabetes, hypertension, and stroke, revealed very high repeatability (κ = 0.81–0.90). Environmental exposures like well-water consumption and prior farm-dwelling produced a moderately good repeatability (κ = 0.66–0.77). In conclusion, our study demonstrates that even over long interval period of more than half a year, self-report lifestyle exposure information, personal and environmental exposure data can be collected with moderate-to-high repeatability from PD patients. © 2008 Movement Disorder Society

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