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Freezing of gait affects quality of life of peoples with Parkinson's disease beyond its relationships with mobility and gait

Authors

  • Orna Moore RN, MA,

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • Chava Peretz PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. School of Health Professions, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • Nir Giladi MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. School of Health Professions, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    3. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    • Movement Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizmann Street, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the association between freezing of gait (FOG) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients (n = 118) completed the PDQ-39 (QoL) and FOG-Q questionnaires. Disease severity was assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The relations between those parameters were assessed using regression models. 66 men and 52 women (mean age 65.8 ± 10.2 years, UPDRS total score 48.4 ± 17.1, disease duration 8.5 ± 5.8 years, H&Y stage 2.7 ± 0.8) participated. FOG severity had a significant effect on QoL (P < 0.0015), accounting for disease severity assessed by UPDRS. Specifically, FOG severity was correlated with all the dimensions of the PDQ-39 except for stigma and social support, as follows: with mobility, bodily discomfort, activity of daily living (ADL) (P < 0.005 in all), with emotional, communication, and cognition (P < 0.05 in all). FOG severity (FOG-Q) was also found to affect a modified PDQ total score, without the mobility aspect (P = 0.0081). FOG should be viewed as a highly important symptom with regard to QoL of PD patients beyond its effect on gait and mobility. On the basis of the present results, special attention should be given to FOG in the treatment of patients with PD. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

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