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Coffee and tea consumption and the risk of Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Gang Hu MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    • Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland
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    • Drs. Hu and Bidel contributed equally to this manuscript as first authors.

  • Siamak Bidel MD,

    1. Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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    • Drs. Hu and Bidel contributed equally to this manuscript as first authors.

  • Pekka Jousilahti MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
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  • Riitta Antikainen MD, PhD,

    1. Oulu City Hospital, Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
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  • Jaakko Tuomilehto MD, PhD

    1. Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Diseases Prevention, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    3. South Ostrobothnia Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland
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Abstract

Several prospective studies have assessed the association between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, but the results are inconsistent. We examined the association of coffee and tea consumption with the risk of incident PD among 29,335 Finnish subjects aged 25 to 74 years without a history of PD at baseline. During a mean follow-up of 12.9 years, 102 men and 98 women developed an incident PD. The multivariate-adjusted (age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, education, leisure-time physical activity, smoking, alcohol and tea consumption, and history of diabetes) hazard ratios (HRs) of PD associated with the amount of coffee consumed daily (0, 1–4, and ≥5 cups) were 1.00, 0.55, and 0.41 (P for trend = 0.063) in men, 1.00, 0.50, and 0.39 (P for trend = 0.073) in women, and 1.00, 0.53, and 0.40 (P for trend = 0.005) in men and women combined (adjusted also for sex), respectively. In both sexes combined, the multivariate-adjusted HRs of PD for subjects drinking ≥3 cups of tea daily compared with tea nondrinkers was 0.41 (95% CI 0.20–0.83). These results suggest that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of PD. More tea drinking is associated with a lower risk of PD. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

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