Pallidal deep brain stimulation improves quality of life in segmental and generalized dystonia: Results from a prospective, randomized sham-controlled trial

Authors

  • Joerg Mueller MD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Joerg Mueller and Inger M. Skogseid contributed equally to this work as first authors.

  • Inger M. Skogseid MD,

    Search for more papers by this author
    • Joerg Mueller and Inger M. Skogseid contributed equally to this work as first authors.

  • Reiner Benecke MD,

  • Andreas Kupsch MD,

  • Thomas Trottenberg MD,

  • Werner Poewe MD,

  • Gerd H. Schneider MD,

  • Wilhelm Eisner MD,

  • Alexander Wolters MD,

  • J.U. Müller MD,

  • Günther Deuschl MD,

  • Marcus O. Pinsker MD,

  • Geir K. Roeste MD,

  • Juliane Vollmer-Haase MD,

  • Angela Brentrup MD,

  • Martin Krause MD,

  • Volker Tronnier MD,

  • Alfons Schnitzler MD,

  • Jüergen Voges MD,

  • Guido Nikkhah MD, PhD,

  • Jan Vesper MD,

  • Markus Naumann MD,

  • Jens Volkmann MD

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Neurology, Christian-Albrechts-University, Schittenhelmstr. 10, D-24105 Kiel, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Members of the “Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia Study Group” are listed as an appendix

Abstract

As part of the first randomized, sham-timulation controlled trial on deep brain stimulation (DBS) in primary segmental or generalized dystonia, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed by SF-36. After the 3-month sham-controlled phase, significant HRQoL improvement occurred only in the active-stimulation group. The open-label extension phase resulted in a significant improvement in all SF-36 domains following 6 months of neurostimulation. These results demonstrate a favorable impact of DBS on HRQoL in primary dystonia. © 2007 Movement Disorder Society

Ancillary