Late onset Wilson's disease: Therapeutic implications

Authors

  • Anna Członkowska MD, PhD,

    1. Second Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland
    2. Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University, Warsaw, Poland
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  • Maria Rodo PhD,

    1. Department of Genetics, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland
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  • Grażyna Gromadzka PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Second Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland
    2. Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University, Warsaw, Poland
    • Second Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Sobieskiego 9, 02-957 Warsaw, Poland

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Abstract

The clinical symptoms of Wilson's disease (WD) usually develop between 3 and 40 years of age and include signs of liver and/or neurologic and psychiatric disease. We report on an 84-year-old woman with WD. Despite the absence of treatment, the only symptom she presented with, until the age of 74 years, was Kayser-Fleisher rings. At the age of 74, she developed slightly abnormal liver function. This case raises the following issues: (a) Should WD be considered in all patients of all ages who manifest signs related to the disease? (b) Are ATP7B mutations fully penetrant? (c) Should all patients diagnosed presymptomatically receive anticopper therapy? © 2008 Movement Disorder Society

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