Uric acid in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Ilana Schlesinger MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Head, Movement Disorders Clinic, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel
    • Head, Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel 31096
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  • Naomi Schlesinger MD

    1. Division of Rheumatology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
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Abstract

Recent studies have provided evidence that uric acid may play a role in the development and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). Uric acid is a natural antioxidant that may reduce oxidative stress, a mechanism thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of PD. Higher levels of serum urate (SU) may have a neuroprotective effect. High SU levels reduced the risk of developing PD and correlated with slower PD progression. Among PD patients SU levels were lower as compared with controls. The manipulation of SU levels holds promise in the treatment of PD. It is possible that a high purine diet in patients with PD may slow progression of the disease. Milk and meat consumption as well as exercise modify the risk of developing PD possibly through their influence on SU levels. In this article, we review the association between PD and SU levels and its implication on the management of PD. © 2008 Movement Disorder Society

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