Atypical dystonic shoulder movements following neuralgic amyotrophy

Authors

  • William F. Abdo MD,

    1. Institute of Neurology and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Parkinson Center Nijmegen (ParC), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Bastiaan R. Bloem MD, PhD,

    1. Institute of Neurology and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Parkinson Center Nijmegen (ParC), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Jeroen J. Eijk MD,

    1. Institute of Neurology and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Alexander C. Geurts MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Rehabilitation, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Nens van Alfen MD, PhD,

    1. Institute of Neurology and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Bart P.C. van de Warrenburg MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Neurology and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Parkinson Center Nijmegen (ParC), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    • Institute of Neurology, Parkinson Center Nijmegen (ParC), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Potential conflict of interest: None reported.

Abstract

Peripherally induced movement disorders are relatively rare. Here, we present 3 patients who suffered a lesion of the brachial plexus because of neuralgic amyotrophy and developed involuntary movements of their shoulder muscles. The nature of the involuntary movements, which did not easily comply with classic descriptions of hyperkinetic movement disorders, is probably best referred to as dystonia. © 2008 Movement Disorder Society

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