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Norepinephrine and cardiovascular responses to maximal exercise in Parkinson's disease on and off medication

Authors

  • Joanne DiFrancisco-Donoghue MA, RCEP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Academic Health Care Center, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Old Westbury, New York, USA
    • Academic Health Care Center of NYCOM/NYIT, Old Westbury, New York
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  • Ahmed Elokda PT, PhD,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, New York Institute of Technology, New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Old Westbury, New York, USA
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  • Eric M. Lamberg PT, EdD,

    1. Department of Physical Therapy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA
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  • Nancy Bono DO,

    1. Academic Health Care Center, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Old Westbury, New York, USA
    2. Department of Family Medicine, NYCOM, NYIT, Old Westbury, New York, USA
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  • William G. Werner PT, EdD

    1. Academic Health Care Center, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Old Westbury, New York, USA
    2. Department of Physical Therapy, New York Institute of Technology, New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Old Westbury, New York, USA
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  • Potential conflict of interest: None reported.

Abstract

The aim of this experiment is to understand how Parkinson's disease (PD) medication affects the autonomic responses of individuals during an acute exercise stress test. Fourteen people with PD and fifteen healthy individuals age-matched between 50 and 80 years performed a modified Bruce protocol. Subjects with PD performed the test once off medication (PD-off) and then 1 week later on medication (PD-on). Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), VO2, and norepinephrine (NE) levels were taken at rest and at peak exercise. At peak exercise HR, BP, and NE values for the PD-on and PD-off group were all significantly lower than healthy controls, regardless of whether subjects were on their medication. Autonomic abnormalities during exercise in this population appear to be disease manifested and not impactedby medications used to treat PD. We can assume, both on and off medication, this population will show markedly lower BP, HR, and NE responses. © 2009 Movement Disorder Society

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