The relationship between quality of life and swallowing in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Emily K. Plowman-Prine PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    3. Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall, Virginia, USA
    • Department of Neurology, McKnight Brain Institute, 100 S. Newell Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610
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  • Christine M. Sapienza PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall, Virginia, USA
    3. Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • Michael S. Okun MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • Stephenie L. Pollock BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • Charles Jacobson BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • Sam S. Wu PhD,

    1. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall, Virginia, USA
    3. Department of Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • John C. Rosenbek PhD

    1. Movement Disorders Center, University of Florida, Florida, USA
    2. Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall, Virginia, USA
    3. Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Florida, USA
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  • Potential conflict of interest: None reported.

Abstract

Few studies exist in the literature investigating the impact of idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (IPD) on swallow-related quality of life. We therefore aimed in this project to: (1) evaluate swallow-specific quality of life in IPD; (2) delineate potential relationships between IPD duration and severity with swallow-specific quality of life; (3) investigate relationships between swallow-specific quality of life and general health-related quality of life; and (4) investigate relationships between swallow-specific quality of life and depression. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with IPD with and without dysphagia filled out self-report assessments of the SWAL-QOL, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A series of Mann Whitney U tests were performed between non-dysphagic and dysphagic groups for the total SWAL-QOL score and the 10 SWAL-QOL domains. Spearman's Rho correlation analyses were performed between the SWAL-QOL and (1) PDQ-39; (2) Hoehn and Yahr stage; (3) PD disease duration; (4) UPDRS “on” score; and (5) the BDI. The dysphagia swallowing group reported significant reductions compared to the non-dysphagic group for the total SWAL-QOL score (P = 0.02), mental health domain score (P = 0.002) and social domain score (P = 0.002). No relationships existed between swallow-specific quality of life and disease duration or severity. Significant relationships existed between swallow-specific quality of life and general health-related quality of life (rs =−0.56, P = 0.000) and depression (rs = −0.48, P = 0.003). These exploratory data highlight the psychosocial sequelae that swallowing impairment can have in those with IPD and suggest a possible association between swallowing, social function, and depression. © 2009 Movement Disorder Society

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