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Vertical optokinetic nystagmus in Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Christopher M. Knapp MD,

    1. Ophthalmology Group, Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Irene Gottlob MD,

    1. Ophthalmology Group, Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Rebecca J. McLean MD,

    1. Ophthalmology Group, Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Yusuf A. Rajabally MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Richard J. Abbott MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Suzanne Rafelt BSc,

    1. Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Clinical Sciences Wing, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, United Kingdom
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  • Frank A. Proudlock PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Ophthalmology Group, Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, United Kingdom
    • Ophthalmology Group, Faculty of Medicine and Biological Sciences, University of Leicester, Robert Kilpatrick Clinical Sciences Building, Leicester Royal Infirmary, PO Box 65, Leicester LE2 7LX, United Kingdom
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a number of oculomotor deficits; however, little is known about changes in vertical optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) associated with PD. We recorded eye movements in 14 PD patients and 14 age-matched controls in response to large field OKN stimulation using stimulus velocities of 20°/second and 40°/second. We compared asymmetry of horizontal and vertical responses in the two groups. We found vertical OKN to be strongly asymmetric in PD with reduced gains for downward-moving stimuli. This asymmetry was significantly greater than that recorded in control volunteers. We postulate that this could result from an abnormal pursuit/early OKN system in PD leading to greater influence of the delayed OKN system. © 2009 Movement Disorder Society

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