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Brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities in early Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Turi O. Dalaker MD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    2. Department of Radiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
    3. The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
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  • Jan P. Larsen MD, PhD,

    1. The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
    2. Department of Neurology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
    3. Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
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  • Niels Bergsland BA,

    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
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  • Mona K. Beyer MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
    2. The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
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  • Guido Alves MD, PhD,

    1. The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
    2. Department of Neurology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
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  • Michael G. Dwyer BS,

    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
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  • Ole-Bjorn Tysnes MD, PhD,

    1. Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
    2. Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
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  • Ralph H.B. Benedict PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, The Jacobs Neurological Institute, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
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  • Arpad Kelemen PhD,

    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
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  • Kolbjorn Bronnick PhD,

    1. The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway
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  • Robert Zivadinov MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    2. Department of Neurology, The Jacobs Neurological Institute, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    • Associate Professor of Neurology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York, Director, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, The Jacobs Neurological Institute, 100 High St., Buffalo, NY 14203
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  • Potential conflict of interest: None reported.

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to examine the extent of global brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in early Parkinson's disease (PD) compared to normal controls (NC), to explore the relationship between the MRI variables and cognition in PD. In this multicenter study we included 155 PD patients (age 65.6 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 26.7 ± 19.9 months) and 101 age-matched NC. On 3D-T1-WI, we calculated normalized brain volumes using SIENAX software. WMH volumes were assessed semiautomatically. In PD patients, correlation and regression analyses investigated the association between atrophy and WMH outcomes and global, attention-executive, visuospatial, and memory cognitive functions. Regression analysis was controlled for age, education, depression score, motor severity, cerebrovascular risk, and sex. No significant MRI variable volume group differences were found. The models did not retain any of the imaging variables as significant predictors of cognitive impairment. There was no evidence of brain atrophy or higher WMH volume in PD compared to NC, and MRI volumetric measurements were not significant predictors of cognitive functions in PD patients. We conclude that global structural brain changes are not a major feature in patients with incident PD. © 2009 Movement Disorder Society

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