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Keywords:

  • Parkinson's disease;
  • anxiety;
  • depression;
  • anxiolytic;
  • antidepressant

Abstract

Anxiety has been less extensively studied than depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). The DoPaMiP survey allowed assessing simultaneously anxiety and depressive symptoms in PD and comparing correlations of both symptoms with clinical and therapeutic features of the disease. Cross sectional survey conducted prospectively in 450 ambulatory nondemented PD patients and 98 patients with other disorders than PD. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), parkinsonism using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Other clinical factors were measured using a structured standardized examination/questionnaire. The mean HADS-A (anxiety) subscore was higher in PD patients than in the others (8.2 ± 3.9 vs. 6.5 ± 3.2, P < 10−4) as was the HADS-D (depressive) subscore (6.6 ± 3.8 vs. 3.9 ± 3.2, P < 10−4). Patients with possible/probable anxious signs (HADS-A ≥ 8) were more prevalent in PD (51% vs. 29%, P < 10−4) as were those with depressive symptoms (40% vs. 10%, P < 10−4). Conversely, anxiolytic and antidepressant medications consumption was not different between the 2 groups. Patients with anxious symptoms were more frequently female and younger than those without such symptoms, while those with depressive symptoms had more severe indices of parkinsonism, more comorbidities and lower cognitive function (Mini Mental State Exam). The logistic regression model revealed that patients with depressive symptoms received more frequently levodopa and less frequently a dopamine agonist. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were more frequent in PD patients than in medical control group. Both symptoms were commonly associated in the same PD patients, but were correlated with different clinical/therapeutic features, suggesting different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. © 2009 Movement Disorder Society